SideLiner hit my Fly!!!!

redjimredjim Posts: 774 Officer
Praise the Lord!

For a couple of months now I have been getting lots of good help around here, which I thank you for. Been fishing for three days with not much then this AM this roof comes off and I am looking for more help. :)

I landed my first two fish this AM both snook about 18-20". I thought it was quite exciting getting those two I have to admit. I had been using white but switched over to orange here becasue water was dirty as could be.

Well, anyway I always leave 4-5 feet of my floating line out on each cast so I have something to start out with. My casts right now are not very long 40' is a VERY good one usually always 30 or so. But I am working on it. Well, anyway in an attempt to get a little longer cast I manually move the rod 3-4 feet at the end of each cast to have the fly in the water longer well anyway on my last cast Grand Pa SNOOK slams down hard on the fly about 12 inches from legs!!!! (Fish was as least 30" or so) . Holy #$%!!!!

So there I am with a 8-10 lb wild animal on my line and I have 35' of stipped line sitting in my basket and I am completely surrounded by mangroves.

I guess I am asking how to get the beast on the reel? Or do I want to get big fish on the reel especailly when groves of mangroves are 5 ' away.

He did get off, but it was exciting for a while. WHAT A RUSH!!!!

Thank you for reading. No photo but this was the fly. Help, Ole Dirt Caster I needed you this AM!!!! :)

661115361_zpsab2d42e0.jpg

Replies

  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 495 Deckhand
    You probably didn't want to try to get that fish to the reel under those circumstances.

    That said, you can get a fish to the reel even if he doesn't run far enough to get tight. You pinch the far part of the fly line (where the fish is pulling) against the rod with your index finger, while you separately pinch the closer part of the line right where it comes off the reel (and is slack) with your pinkie to give you some tension. Then you reel with your left until all the slack loops come out. Good to practice with ladyfish, not with trophies you really want to catch.

    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • redjimredjim Posts: 774 Officer
    Thanks Mark!

    Maybe I should start with bream on something like that. I appreciate the tip!
  • Permit RatPermit Rat Posts: 2,283 Captain
    In my boat we never try to get the fish on the reel when near docks or mangroves. For the smaller fish, it just takes too much time. For a bigger fish I find I can maintain max pressure better and possibly keep his head turned away from the dock/mangrove. Usually when you start to focus on something like winding line on a reel, well, at least I seem to lose my concentration for a half second here or there and the fish gets his head. If it is a big fish and he later heads for open water......that's a different story and I do put the line on the reel.
    .......Rick
  • redjimredjim Posts: 774 Officer
    Thanks, Permit Rat! Very helpful,.....

    So Permit, you bascailly are just manhandling the fish,... big or small when near any kind of structure?

    I have a lot to learn! :)
  • sparse greysparse grey Posts: 1,751 Captain
    Keep the learning fun & keep at it.
    Ron Conner Release the fish, keep the memories. Once a Knight is enough.
  • idlerickidlerick Posts: 229 Deckhand
    I agree that in close quarters like that trying to put the fish on the reel will cause you to lose him more often than not.
    But in more open water when you want to put one on the reel, instead of trying to reel fast to gain line, try "slapping" down on the spool rim repeatedly with your off hand while you keep line tension with the other hand. That will cause the spool to rotate 6-8 revolutions MUCH faster than you can reel by hand and take up line quickly. It won't be neat, but it will get loose line off the deck in a hurry.
    :)
  • redjimredjim Posts: 774 Officer
    Thank you, guys.
  • One more castOne more cast Posts: 145 Officer
    Permit Rat wrote: »
    In my boat we never try to get the fish on the reel when near docks or mangroves. For the smaller fish, it just takes too much time. For a bigger fish I find I can maintain max pressure better and possibly keep his head turned away from the dock/mangrove. Usually when you start to focus on something like winding line on a reel, well, at least I seem to lose my concentration for a half second here or there and the fish gets his head. If it is a big fish and he later heads for open water......that's a different story and I do put the line on the reel.
    Too often I lose big fish while trying to get them on the reel near structure as well. Makes my stomach hurt.
  • redjimredjim Posts: 774 Officer
    idlerick wrote: »
    I agree that in close quarters like that trying to put the fish on the reel will cause you to lose him more often than not.
    But in more open water when you want to put one on the reel, instead of trying to reel fast to gain line, try "slapping" down on the spool rim repeatedly with your off hand while you keep line tension with the other hand. That will cause the spool to rotate 6-8 revolutions MUCH faster than you can reel by hand and take up line quickly. It won't be neat, but it will get loose line off the deck in a hurry.

    Sweet idlerick, I thought of you and your statement this AM when I latched into a big ladyfish, worked great. GREAT TIP,.......Thanks,......
  • Permit RatPermit Rat Posts: 2,283 Captain
    Redjim....that trick will probably work with 99.9999% of the snook or other "small" fish that you might encounter inshore. But I would not use it with big fish, especially tarpon. Occasionally, a hooked tarpon will go nuts around the boat and you might not be able to get him on the reel for quite some time. In the case of tarpon, I think it is very important toward your success, if you maintain line control and pressure UNTIL the fish clears all that line away himself, by running. just remember that anytime you put line on the reel by slapping the spool, that that line is going on very loosely. Then when he comes really tight, your line might bury itself in those loose turns on the reel. In any event, you should allow the fish to run off that loose line, so that you can have all tight line on your spool. This all takes time in which the fish is getting his wits about him, resting, whatever....and with big tarpon, you don't want to give an inch....ever.....if possible. Just MHO.
    .......Rick
  • redjimredjim Posts: 774 Officer
    Oh Permit Rat, those are some wise words right there! Thank you for taking the time!!
  • Permit RatPermit Rat Posts: 2,283 Captain
    No problem. As an illustration (I had to look it up in my logs) I usually glance at my watch, as soon as a client hooks up. Kind of a habit I guess. One day we had a smallish fish (60-65 lbs.) eat the fly and it took 37 seconds before he was on the reel. This puppy went ballistic, all around the boat!!..... but never took off. (look at your watch sometime, and count off 37 seconds, while imagining you have just hooked a tarpon...this is a helluva long time!) Anyway, to me, hand fighting a tarpon is more of an advanced technique.....you hope you don't have to do this until you have at least a few fish under your belt. We got him, but we were very lucky, as this was his first.
    .......Rick
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