Can I get a to GO box please?........St. Pete Offshore 2/4 - Page 3

Florida Sportsman

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 40
  1. #21
    Senior Member perlman1234's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Tampa
    Posts
    1,389
    Quote Originally Posted by Reel-Lucky View Post
    Fisherman go out routinely much further than 40 mi.with single power, the majority of commercial boats go out all the time with a single screw diesel.
    More times than not, when a question is prefaced with "I'm not trying to be a blank...but", you're usually being a blank.
    Haha, this is like cursing for you! I got to be nice or I get myself in trouble, so I thought I would say what I take along with me. I believe you should never be scared on a boat going offshore. So if you feel that way by all means stay at home while we slay fish in our tiny boats. It is o.k. to be safe and make sure people have an epirb and vhf, other than that to me you are asking to many questions. I think when you have a smaller boat with one engine you do more to make sure everything is up to par and you have all the proper safety gear. As for the life raft???? If you are going to suggest that than it doesnt matter how big your boat is now does it. If it is sinking it is sinking.

    Mako you are right if you have a trustworthy engine that is 90% of the worries. All the rest is what the epirb and vhf's are for....

  2. #22
    Senior Member Mango Tango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    St Pete/Islamorada
    Posts
    1,327
    Hey guys been away for a few to include the Miami boat show today. THE FREEMAN 33 IS THE MOST INCREDIBLE BOAT I HAVE RIDDEN.......and I have been on a few. It would be hard to imagine seas that could stop this boat. Anyway, as you can tell I am still jazzed about my ride today. It IS everything that you have heard about it x10.

    Going out far......yeah guilty as charged. My main spots are actually 100-120 mi out. Sometimes fished solo when people cnx at the last minute. Sometimes 2-3 days. No, I don't charter.



    As said, and i hate to bust an urban myth but most far offshore boats are single engine........simple economics.

    What kind of equipment does it actually take to fish far offshore? A seaworthy boat with the appropriate range, reliable power, and one that offers protection from the elements. My range is 350-400 miles. It is prudent to have devices that can communicate in real time with people ashore, such as tracking devices (like the one above) and an EPIRB. It is prudent to have access to realtime wx RADAR. It's smart to carry extra parts, safety equipment, to include a wetsuit/basic dive gear and extra food/water.

    Now that you have the right equipment to get far offshore, what type of person does it take to fish safely far offshore? You must be an experienced waterman. This means among other things, you must have training in wx, and wx forecasting. You need to be able to look at the sky and sea conditions and make a seat of the pants judgement about what's going to happen or not happen next and be prepared for it. If you can master the wx and all the planning and logistics for an offshore trip then you've got about 90 percent of equation covered.

    For those who know me and my background, there is no question as to my training and experience in the aforementioned areas. Is fishing far offshore dangerous? Yeah, it is but it's a calculated risk, and is a risk not to be taken lightly, nor is it a risk to be taken by the unprepared or untrained.
    Last edited by Mango Tango; 02-15-2013 at 10:58 PM.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sparta
    Posts
    345
    Mango, Mako et.al.

    I figured I'd take a little heat. I'm fairly certain there are folks that visit FS forum that do not have the expertise, experience or knowledge of venturing "out there" such as you.

    Assuming I'm novice by the post is incorrect - but understandable based on how I asked the questions. I run two boats, a 30' Grady and a 40' Cabo. Been back-forth to both coasts. Been fishing the waters around Florida and Alabama for over 30 years. I've seen some pretty ridiculous things out there (a pontoon boat 15+ out from Cedar Key for example). I'm not trying to make any offense. IMHO it seems prudent to caveat discussions about ventures far out with some relative safety comments - at least that way they are part of the discourse and in the thread. Part and parcel of being an experienced waterman is passing along knowledge and mentoring.

    Single engine. More of a philosophical discussion than anything. Some would say that two is better than one; whilst the other camp would say with two you have twice the chance of an engine failure. It is a personal choice when it comes down to it. The vessels you refer to venturing single engine are purpose built. They have low slung weight and ballast to provide better stability in rough water in addition to good sea keeping ability should they become adrift. Most folks will also carry a sea anchor with them for this eventuality. It's been my experience as both a professional aviator (fly for a living) and long time offshore angler; I'd rather have 2+ engines than one. Of course economics factor in there as well, and reference those single engine vessels they are in business of making a profit. I would also surmise the larger ones carry an engineer on board.

    Anyway, thanks for the clarification, you certainly seem to have your feces consolidated. Hopefully some read your post and learn from it.

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sparta
    Posts
    345
    Quote Originally Posted by perlman1234 View Post
    As for the life raft???? If you are going to suggest that than it doesnt matter how big your boat is now does it. If it is sinking it is sinking
    You might want to read this on hypothermia:
    http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/hypothermia.htm

    And lets not forget exposure to the elements. Some years ago when I went through military water survival training (and every year thereafter for about 20 years) the SAR instructors discussed the "STAY" rules: stay afloat, stay dry, stay still, stay warm, stay together and stay with the raft,vessel,aircraft (assuming the former and latter are still floating).

    You can be cavalier about the raft, I sir, will not.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Mango Tango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    St Pete/Islamorada
    Posts
    1,327
    Quote Originally Posted by Typiclese View Post
    You might want to read this on hypothermia:
    http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/hypothermia.htm
    ........thanks for your service shipmate. And, you have just identified the single most dangerous factor that boaters with less experience fail to consider. In a survival situation, it's hypothermia, not drowning, sharks, or dehydration that is going to get you in the end.

    Guys that fish with me sometimes ask why I carry a wet suit/dive gear in my ditch bag. I tell them if the EPIRB and PLB fail and we are out there for a while, someone has to survive to tell the story.........that's going to be the guy wearing the wet suit. There is a reason why the Navy requires helicopter aircrew to wear a wetsuit under their flightsuit when the water temp is less than 60 degrees.

    It is a risk assessment thing for me as far as deciding to not own, carry and maintain a life raft. I am comfortable with my abilities in the water protected by a wetsuit which will get me through until my emergency beacon summons the calvary.

    FWIW if you have read my FS fishing reports, recently you would have noticed that I rescued a 32 Sabalo (single engine) while fishing 40+ miles out. He had wrapped a heavy line around his jackshaft and was DIW. It was getting dark and they had given up surmising they were permanently disabled. I told the Capt what needed to be done and let him borrow some dive gear. 20 minutes later they were headed east under their own power. Don't underestimate the value of carrying some basic dive gear/wetsuit.

  6. #26
    Senior Member perlman1234's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Tampa
    Posts
    1,389
    HAHA typiclese if you are going to quote me and tell me to read something please read what you are quoting. All I was saying was it doesn't matter the Size of boat if its at the bottom of the ocean. having the life raft has nothing to do with the actual size of the boat.If I had the room I would more than likely have one. Not a bad idea for a single engine boat.

    Mango the wetsuit is a very good idea!

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    221
    There is some great information in this thread about survivial and some great ideas for all to be safe. I for one like the wet suit idea as I do nothave that in the ditch bag. Back to the first post, great looking boat and nice report. Hopefully this wind will die down and we can go get something to eat with all these regulations.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Navy_Fishing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tampa Bay
    Posts
    706
    Just to clarify, as an actual Helicopter Aircrewman with the Navy for 24 years, we wore drysuits, not wetsuits, as a wetsuit would be on itchy son-a-***** once the sweating started. But the main point is correct, exposure to the elements is the main danger in a ditch situation, whether ditching an aircraft or off a boat. Size of the boat in regards to distance traveled is relative to the seaworthiness of the boat, experience of the operator, and weather conditions. Those who plan well and have well thought out plans for any sort of situation that might arise are going to be the one's telling the story and teaching the lesson in the end.
    EPIC Marine Manufacturing. Makers of affordable, quality Engine Brackets, Swim Platforms, Fuel tanks and other customized marine products. http://www.epic-marine.com/

  9. #29
    Senior Member Mango Tango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    St Pete/Islamorada
    Posts
    1,327
    Quote Originally Posted by Navy_Fishing View Post
    Just to clarify, as an actual Helicopter Aircrewman................

    Thank you for your service shipmate.

    My credentials are Water Survival Instructor, SAR swimmer/Tactical aircrewman SH60B, H3, H2, Crew chief MH60 Pavehawk, CNO Special Projects Sensor1 operator P3C. Just to clarify, in the operational helicopter squadrons I served in, wet aircrewman were not issued drysuits. We wore wet suits when the water temp dictated their use. Making generalizations based on your experiences while interesting, don't always apply the experiences of others.

    Carry on.
    Last edited by Mango Tango; 02-18-2013 at 09:34 PM.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Navy_Fishing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tampa Bay
    Posts
    706
    As a 7873 and a 7815 we never wore wetsuits as protection against the elements while on routine or operational flights, unless of course we were on a SAR mission and were the designated swimmer for that flight. As a 60B guy, you would know that. Where were you stationed, as we must know the same exact folks. And when did you retire? You must have been a Master Chief AW and if that's the case, we should know each other.
    Last edited by Navy_Fishing; 02-19-2013 at 11:26 AM.
    EPIC Marine Manufacturing. Makers of affordable, quality Engine Brackets, Swim Platforms, Fuel tanks and other customized marine products. http://www.epic-marine.com/

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •