How to get rid of green slimy algae?
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  1. #1
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    How to get rid of green slimy algae?

    You know the kind. It has those little black dots in it and is mushy in your fingers when you pull it off your lure.

    My favorite sand bottom pond is starting to grow this stuff after being "pristine" for many years. How do you nip it in the bud? I've thought about going out and netting a bunch of Plecos and turning them loose in there. There are already a few grass carp and it has NO growing vegitation in it at all.

    Help! Before it becomes like the pond next to it which is a mucked up mess, and has been for quite some time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Jim311's Avatar
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    That algae is caused by fertilizers. You could probably put some algae eater fish in there but I'm not sure what kind would be best.

  3. #3
    Senior Member dieselbeef's Avatar
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    copper sulfate pr a blue dye..lots of info on the net bout it
    16 ccf wellcraft.....

  4. #4
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    call palm beach aquatics! My cousin works there and specializes in this stuff (877) 744-5253

  5. #5
    Senior Member Snookmeister's Avatar
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    Yea blue dye works, and and the copper stuff. I have sprayed a product called Green Clean a couple times and it works amazing. I believe it hydrogen dioxide HO2. Nasty nasty stuff though, extremely corrosive. But dang does it work. Your real problem is excessive phosphates and mostly nitrates in the water, likely from run off. I would NOT release algae eaters, especially not carp.
    Catch 'em and Release 'em!
    http://tampaurbanangler.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
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    More than likely you have filamentous algae. My company also specializes in control and management of aquatic plants. I'd be happy to take a look at it. I also don't recommend putting plecos in there, as they probably won't take care of the problem and because they tend to burrow just below the shoreline and can erode the bank.

    I typically work in the East Central region, but I am in Orlando frequently and I wouldn't mind traveling a bit to help out a forum member.

    Our number is (321)-285-6612

    And here is a link to the website. The number on the site will reach me, but the one I listed above is better.

    http://flcustomaquatic.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wareagle85 View Post
    More than likely you have filamentous algae. My company also specializes in control and management of aquatic plants. I'd be happy to take a look at it. I also don't recommend putting plecos in there, as they probably won't take care of the problem and because they tend to burrow just below the shoreline and can erode the bank.

    I typically work in the East Central region, but I am in Orlando frequently and I wouldn't mind traveling a bit to help out a forum member.

    Our number is (321)-285-6612

    And here is a link to the website. The number on the site will reach me, but the one I listed above is better.

    http://flcustomaquatic.com
    That's very kind of you but I was more looking for some DIY advice for my favorite DOT retention pond. Is there any harm (not worried about erosion) with the Plecos on the LMB population? There doesnt seem to be much of any other species I can find in there, and they sure are in abundance in many local bodies of water.
    Last edited by Pescatoral Pursuit; 01-03-2013 at 12:23 AM.

  8. #8
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    No problem, Here's what I can tell you:

    First of all, Plecos (Common name:Vermiculated sailfin catfish) are common, and effective at cleaning algae in tanks because they are scrapers, meaning they scrape algae off of surfaces such as aquarium windows. In the wild, they primarily eat periphyton, a form of algae that grows on, and is attached to submersed surfaces (Rocks, sticks, other plants, etc.) They will only be mildly effective on big mats of free floating filamentous algae. Furthermore, they are a non-native species in Florida and although they are already established in many waterbodies, you are not supposed to release them into the wild. As far as harm on the LMB population, there isnt really any documented affects that they will harm native sportfish. They don't compete for the same resources. They will take up available biomass in a pond that could potentially be used by sportfish, and they may reduce the amount of cover for juvenile bass but overall they are more destructive to the shore than they are to the native fish populations.

    Another option is the Grass Carp. However, they also are not the best at controlling filamentous algae. They are also a non-native and require a permit by FWC if you are going to stock them. Also they must be purchased as triploid (sterile) to avoid any reproduction (Which likely wouldnt happen anyways in a retention pond because they spawn in rivers, but thats a whole other conversation). They cost about $ 10 bucks each, depending on size and you only need a couple per acre. Sometimes, if theres large bass present, you would need to stock a larger size to avoid predation and those can be more expensive.

    Another option is hand removal. If there isnt a ton of it you cuold go out and take it out with rakes, or other harvesting tools. This is cheap, but labor intensive and a huge PIA.

    Your best bet is chemical treatment. Copper sulfate is the way to go and there are lots of brands out there to choose from. you can get it in granular form or liquid, I prefer liquid as we primarily use sprayers. Don't use too much since high concentrations can be toxic to fish (Treat a quarter or half the lake one day, and do the rest on later dates). A word of caution when using any chemical treatment: Always follow all directions on the label of the package. It is actually against the law to not follow the label. Also remember when using chemical treatments, some chemicals are listed as restricted use, meaning only someone with a commercial pesticide/herbicide applicators license can purchase and apply those chemicals.

    If you are not the owner of the pond I would not recommend any of the above methods. You could try contacting the owner and discussing with them your concerns. If it is a DOT retention pond, they have certain water quality they need to keep and chemical treatments may alter that temproarily. The best way to control algae is to prevent it, which would include trying to reduce the nutrient input as others have already stated.

    Little ponds can be a pain sometimes but they sure are fun to fish and can produce some monsters.

    I hope any of this info may help, even if you can't apply it to the current situation, you may find use for it down the road. If you have any more questions you can feel free to call or email me, or reach me through the forum. Good Luck.

  9. #9
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    Releasing fish into a pond really won't work too well. The only fish that I could think of that would be safe to release would be mullet. They eat algae, adapt to freshwater pretty well, and as far as I know, and I may be wrong, do not breed in freshwater.
    By ways of plecos, don't release them anywhere. I have seen the banks of some ponds get so destroyed by their burrowing that it is impossible to fish from shore. Their holes can collapse and can easily lead to a broken leg or fall into the water.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ShallowExpectations's Avatar
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    killlakeweeds.com It's been advertising in FS for years.

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