Big Hungry Banana River Trout 5-25

Florida Sportsman

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  1. #1
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    Big Hungry Banana River Trout 5-25

    Decided to hit the water this morning before Memorial Day weekend boat traffic hits full swing. I'm fortunate to have a customer who is also a friend, so we can officially call it a work day. We lost more fish today than I can ever remember losing (pulled hooks, broken lines & frayed leaders from mangrove roots and docks, etc.). It's still pretty fun getting freight trained; even when you lose. Despite our early futility, we landed ten trout (mostly overslot fish) and four reds (kept two slot fish) and were off the water by 10am. All the overslot trout were released. I don't keep trout and Scott agreed with my theory of sending all the big girls back to repopulate the gene pool.
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    I think we can all agree that it has been a phenomenal year for big trout in the Indian River Lagoon system. Given that, I have some grave concerns about our future fishery. Our usual healthy seagrass is virtually non-existant from north of Pineda causeway to Sebastian Inlet. My concern is: although we seem to have a healthy supply of breeding size trout; there is little to no nursery for a successful spawn to survive. My fear is that without the grass and all the organisms that live in it; our baby trout, snook, and reds will have no nursery to grow up in. They will die from either starvation or predation. I think our adult fish will be fine (provided we do not harvest/remove them) as there are plenty of finfish (mullet, menhaden, etc.) to eat. I am fearfull that our fishing will suffer dramatically two years and more into the future as year classes are lost due to non-existant or inadequate nursery areas. Hopefully a marine biologist or someone with more knowledge than me can chime in and tell me I'm wrong.
    Last edited by jmsnookman; 05-25-2012 at 07:58 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cavanaugh68's Avatar
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    Nice trout! Great seeing this out there! Good on the release!

  3. #3
    Senior Member fishboy's Avatar
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    Those are some SLOB trout!!

  4. #4
    Member BMargio's Avatar
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    that thing is just ridiculous. nice trout

  5. #5
    Senior Member jumboshrimp's Avatar
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    Those are some beautiful trout. having never fished the lagoon system that far south I can't comment on the lack of seagrass but I really hope you're wrong with your concerns, doesn't sound like a good thing at all.

  6. #6
    Senior Member angler18's Avatar
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    great trout, fat pigs!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmsnookman View Post
    I have some grave concerns about our future fishery. Our usual healthy seagrass is virtually non-existant from north of Pineda causeway to Sebastian Inlet. My concern is: although we seem to have a healthy supply of breeding size trout; there is little to no nursery for a successful spawn to survive. My fear is that without the grass and all the organisms that live in it; our baby trout, snook, and reds will have no nursery to grow up in. They will die from either starvation or predation. I think our adult fish will be fine (provided we do not harvest/remove them) as there are plenty of finfish (mullet, menhaden, etc.) to eat. I am fearfull that our fishing will suffer dramatically two years and more into the future as year classes are lost due to non-existant or inadequate nursery areas. Hopefully a marine biologist or someone with more knowledge than me can chime in and tell me I'm wrong.
    Just to expand on that....the lack of grass continues down to the Round island area of the IR lagoon.

    And you bring up very good points.....

    I too fear a collapse in our fishery...
    even though the fishing for some species (big Trout) seems to be very good at this point.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you

  8. #8
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    Geat looking fish, all we can do is hope the grasses will return, this summer. Don't the sea grasses go dormant in the winter in some places? It seams that the places with good tide flow loose the grasses more than the ones with poor flow, like ML.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Garbo's Avatar
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    Dang.



    .

  10. #10
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    Congrats on the productive morning. Good to see the big ones are still out there.

    I frequently fish the Sebastian flats area, in both a Kayak and Flats boat and have also notice the grass being scarce this year, especially around the north side of Longpoint where were some grass patches that looked like a front lawn. I share your concern over the habitat change and what impact it will have on the future.

    Hopefully a marine biologist will be reading the forums and can provide some input.

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