HEADS UP FOR CORROSION UNDER REAR COCKPIT ACCESS PORTS

Florida Sportsman

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Ocean Motion's Avatar
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    HEADS UP FOR CORROSION UNDER REAR COCKPIT ACCESS PORTS

    Doug, the chief mechanic at Manatee Marina where we store our boat, diagnosed a leaking fuel issue immediately the other day after we returned from a day on the water. After a day of letting the fumes dissipate from the bilge and tank area, Jon, our other mechanic, repaired the faulty corroded fuel gage, cleaned the top of the fuel tank and flushed the whole fuel compartment. Now, when you look through the access ports, all looks brand new!

    Jon advised me that at least every other time you go out to remove the access ports and flush the top of the tanks with fresh water and then spray the front and back access ports with CRC 6-56 to help prevent salt water corrosion. The two access ports are NOT waterproof! The front port contains the fuel sending switch and the rear access port contains the fuel line connections. Armed with this info, it adds one more routine maintenance item to my list.

    Picture #1 is the old fuel sending switch.


    Picture #2 is the top of the old fuel sending switch and the red arrows indicate the three spots that corroded completely through the plate causing the fuel leak out of the main tank.



    We are very thankful this incident was discovered when the boat was removed from the water and not when we were out "on the water' where it could have become a "deadly major issue".
    http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d106/OceanMotion200/Howie2.jpg

  2. #2
    Senior Member ChadJ55's Avatar
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    Wow, good find. What year is your boat?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Ocean Motion's Avatar
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    2002

    PS: It is For Sale
    http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d106/OceanMotion200/Howie2.jpg

  4. #4
    Senior Member ChadJ55's Avatar
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    Hank, you were so right about this issue! Every Bluewater 2350 and 2550 owner (at least) should pay CLOSE attention to this thread. Fuel leaks and vapors are such a dangerous scenario on a boat. Your post here helped me finally track down the root of my problem, and it was the EXACT same thing. Here's a picture of the sending unit I removed from my boat last night. It is a 2004 2350 that is very well maintained, always covered and trailer kept.





    And here's how we look now:



    I am so relieved to have found and fixed this problem and owe you a gigantic THANK YOU for creating this original post and being so helpful, along with your wife, over the phone.

    Bluewater owners, I implore you to check your access ports in the floor to see if your sending unit is beginning to corrode. Chances are you'll see a lot of debris in there. Take a small brush, like a toothbrush, and gently move the debris off the sending unit. When I did this, I quickly saw the hole that had been causing my issue. Only when I removed the unit did I see just how large the hole actually was.

    A new WEMA sending unit is less than $50. For a 2350 you'll need the 16" version of this model. I verified with Karen at Bluewater before ordering it.

    http://www.wemausa.com/tank-sensors/...nk_sensors.htm Installation is very easy.

    If you inspect your access ports and find debris/corrosion, you should be diligent about cleaning it off because the debris will cause further corrosion and could eventually ruin your tank. To replace your tank will cost upwards of $5,000. For under $50 and a bit of patience and cleaning, you can prevent this. But even more importantly, you can prevent a dangerous fuel leak that could turn into every boater's worst nightmare.

    If your sending unit looks fine, something we should all do, as suggested by Paul at BW, is to put a nice size bead of silicone grease around your access ports a.k.a pie plates to keep the water out. It is also a good idea to spray some anti-corrosive in there as Hank suggests. There are NOT waterproof.

    If anyone has questions about this process, what to look for, etc., feel free to contact me. I'd be happy to help.

    -Chad

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ocean Motion's Avatar
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    Chad,

    Thank you for posting your findings as I suggested. One can never be too carefull when it comes to gas fumes/leaks on a boat. This weekend we are closing on Ocean Motion and turning her over to, whom we feel, are a young couple that will give O.M. the TLC that she has been used to for the past 7 years.

    Congrats to Jennifer and Graham on their new ride!
    http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d106/OceanMotion200/Howie2.jpg

  6. #6
    Senior Member Kevinwwings2's Avatar
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    Great call. I checked mine after getting a PM from Chad about it. Thank you buddy. My 03 was not corroded through, but was pitted bad enough it was just a matter of time. Need less to say new one received and installing today.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mako's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ocean Motion View Post
    Doug, the chief mechanic at Manatee Marina where we store our boat, diagnosed a leaking fuel issue immediately the other day after we returned from a day on the water. After a day of letting the fumes dissipate from the bilge and tank area, Jon, our other mechanic, repaired the faulty corroded fuel gage, cleaned the top of the fuel tank and flushed the whole fuel compartment. Now, when you look through the access ports, all looks brand new!

    Jon advised me that at least every other time you go out to remove the access ports and flush the top of the tanks with fresh water and then spray the front and back access ports with CRC 6-56 to help prevent salt water corrosion. The two access ports are NOT waterproof! The front port contains the fuel sending switch and the rear access port contains the fuel line connections. Armed with this info, it adds one more routine maintenance item to my list.

    Picture #1 is the old fuel sending switch.


    Picture #2 is the top of the old fuel sending switch and the red arrows indicate the three spots that corroded completely through the plate causing the fuel leak out of the main tank.



    We are very thankful this incident was discovered when the boat was removed from the water and not when we were out "on the water' where it could have become a "deadly major issue".
    Mine did the exact same thing. Definitly check your access hatches for this issue.
    Also, would be nice if the access hatch would have been bigger on my boat.

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