Roasted Chicken?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Larry Mac's Avatar
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    Roasted Chicken?

    So I am on this 17 day diet thing with my wife and tonights dinner calls for roasted chicken. So forum brethren, pray tell, ( guess I am headed to google) what is the difference between baked and roasted chicken?

  2. #2
    Senior Member nuclearfishn's Avatar
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    I'm not sure but roasted chicken might be done on a rotisserie and done at a higher heat. The drippings fall away from the bird.
    I could be wrong. It won't surprise me.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Holt's Avatar
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    I dunno the answer but I would spatchcock that bird and be sure and use some rosemary in the rub.

  4. #4
    Senior Member T Top's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holt View Post
    I dunno the answer but I would spatchcock that bird and be sure and use some rosemary in the rub.
    Are you sure that is legal to do to a chicken?

  5. #5
    Senior Member GA Fin's Avatar
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    Dunno.

    Go to Sam's and get a BBQ rotisserie chicken.
    "The greatest pleasure is to vanquish your enemies and chase them before you, to rob them of their wealth and see those dear to them bathed in tears, to ride their horses and clasp to your bosom their wives and daughters."

  6. #6
    Senior Member Grady-lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Mac View Post
    ...what is the difference between baked and roasted chicken?
    Baked is cooked in your oven...roasted is what Publix does, or is that rotisserie?

    I think...roasted means on a rack above the juices, higher temp, uncovered...but google probably knows best. Good luck!
    I find my peace out on the sand...Beside the sea, not beyond or behind. R.A. Britt

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  7. #7
    Senior Member Dude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuclearfishn View Post
    I'm not sure but roasted chicken might be done on a rotisserie and done at a higher heat. The drippings fall away from the bird.
    I could be wrong. It won't surprise me.
    Pretty much nailed it with this description.
    DUDE!

  8. #8
    Senior Member nuclearfishn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T Top View Post
    Are you sure that is legal to do to a chicken?
    You don't want spatchcocking on your record. that will follow you wherever you go. The police have web sites devoted to identifying spatchcokers.

  9. #9
    Moderator Flash's Avatar
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    Preheat the oven to 450°F. Rinse the chicken, then dry it very well with paper towels, inside and out. The less it steams, the drier the heat, the better.

    Salt and pepper the cavity, then truss the bird. Trussing is not difficult, and if you roast chicken often, it's a good technique to feel comfortable with. When you truss a bird, the wings and legs stay close to the body; the ends of the drumsticks cover the top of the breast and keep it from drying out. Trussing helps the chicken to cook evenly, and it also makes for a more beautiful roasted bird.

    Now, salt the chicken—I like to rain the salt over the bird so that it has a nice uniform coating that will result in a crisp, salty, flavorful skin (about 1 tablespoon). When it's cooked, you should still be able to make out the salt baked onto the crisp skin. Season to taste with pepper.

    Place the chicken in a sauté pan or roasting pan and, when the oven is up to temperature, put the chicken in the oven. I leave it alone—I don't baste it, I don't add butter; you can if you wish, but I feel this creates steam, which I don't want. Roast it until it's done, 50 to 60 minutes. Remove it from the oven and add the thyme, if using, to the pan. Baste the chicken with the juices and thyme and let it rest for 15 minutes on a cutting board.

    Remove the twine. Separate the middle wing joint and eat that immediately. Remove the legs and thighs. I like to take off the backbone and eat one of the oysters, the two succulent morsels of meat embedded here, and give the other to the person I'm cooking with. But I take the chicken butt for myself. I could never understand why my brothers always fought over that triangular tip—until one day I got the crispy, juicy fat myself. These are the cook's rewards. Cut the breast down the middle and serve it on the bone, with one wing joint still attached to each. The preparation is not meant to be superelegant. Slather the meat with fresh butter. Serve with mustard on the side and, if you wish, a simple green salad. You'll start using a knife and fork, but finish with your fingers, because it's so good.

    So, what is the difference:

    Roasting and baking are almost identical methods of dry heat cooking, the terms roasting and baking apply to two different kinds of foods. You generally roast food that has structure already, solid foods such as meats and vegetables. You generally bake foods that don’t have much structure until they are baked: cakes, breads, pies, casseroles, crème brulee, etc.

    In other words, you bake leavened items - items that “puff up” or “rise” during the cooking process. In baking, aside from just “cooking” the food, the goal is to either create steam or expand air pockets within the target food.

    And yes, I googled.


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  10. #10
    Senior Member Larry Mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    Preheat the oven to 450°F. Rinse the chicken, then dry it very well with paper towels, inside and out. The less it steams, the drier the heat, the better.

    Salt and pepper the cavity, then truss the bird. Trussing is not difficult, and if you roast chicken often, it's a good technique to feel comfortable with. When you truss a bird, the wings and legs stay close to the body; the ends of the drumsticks cover the top of the breast and keep it from drying out. Trussing helps the chicken to cook evenly, and it also makes for a more beautiful roasted bird.

    Now, salt the chicken—I like to rain the salt over the bird so that it has a nice uniform coating that will result in a crisp, salty, flavorful skin (about 1 tablespoon). When it's cooked, you should still be able to make out the salt baked onto the crisp skin. Season to taste with pepper.

    Place the chicken in a sauté pan or roasting pan and, when the oven is up to temperature, put the chicken in the oven. I leave it alone—I don't baste it, I don't add butter; you can if you wish, but I feel this creates steam, which I don't want. Roast it until it's done, 50 to 60 minutes. Remove it from the oven and add the thyme, if using, to the pan. Baste the chicken with the juices and thyme and let it rest for 15 minutes on a cutting board.

    Remove the twine. Separate the middle wing joint and eat that immediately. Remove the legs and thighs. I like to take off the backbone and eat one of the oysters, the two succulent morsels of meat embedded here, and give the other to the person I'm cooking with. But I take the chicken butt for myself. I could never understand why my brothers always fought over that triangular tip—until one day I got the crispy, juicy fat myself. These are the cook's rewards. Cut the breast down the middle and serve it on the bone, with one wing joint still attached to each. The preparation is not meant to be superelegant. Slather the meat with fresh butter. Serve with mustard on the side and, if you wish, a simple green salad. You'll start using a knife and fork, but finish with your fingers, because it's so good.

    So, what is the difference:

    Roasting and baking are almost identical methods of dry heat cooking, the terms roasting and baking apply to two different kinds of foods. You generally roast food that has structure already, solid foods such as meats and vegetables. You generally bake foods that don’t have much structure until they are baked: cakes, breads, pies, casseroles, crème brulee, etc.

    In other words, you bake leavened items - items that “puff up” or “rise” during the cooking process. In baking, aside from just “cooking” the food, the goal is to either create steam or expand air pockets within the target food.

    And yes, I googled.
    He's no Flash in the pan! Thanks -- nicely done

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