Need tips for overnighting on a boat - Page 2
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDude727 View Post
    When I've been to Egmont the current there has been so strong I was nervous anchoring during daylight hours. Of course, that's when there has been a lot of boats lined up next to each other. That's also on the west side of the island, is it less crazy on the east or bay side?
    yes, i have seen catamaran sail boats anchored up there on the east side, current isn't terribly strong the closer you get to the key and it gets shallow there too, 10-15'. I don't think I'd anchor on the west side for an overnight, i'd want to be protected and be in the bay.

    But it might not be a bad first time overnight there. Definitely worth internet scouting. That is what I would do. Get on Googlemaps and start looking up and down the coastline for a spot you would feel secure overnight as a start.
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.

  2. #12
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    if you have done a lot of tent camping you won't need A/C, but you will need to make netting to stop bugs from entering the cabin. I had a cabin boat many years ago and we made netting that attached to Velcro strips that we epoxyed completely around the companion way and the bow hatch opening. This netting was No-See-Um proof, so we could anchor in protected places where it was calm. Of course we often were stuck in the cabin for long hours until the mosquitoes and no-see-ums departed. They usually departed after a few hours after dusk but we always checked the netting with a flash light before exiting the cabin. One night i had cabin fever around midnight and shined the flash light on the companion way netting and was horrified to see that the netting had turned totally black with mosquitoes !!
    Giimoozaabi

  3. #13
    Senior Member Grady-lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDude727 View Post
    I'm pretty surprised that nightfly is the only one recommending radar. I would have thought that radar would be the single best piece of equipment you can have for overnighting but I've never had one so I don't know anything about it. Grady-Lady pretty much confirmed what I am expecting will happen to me and that is that no matter what I do I'll end up being so nervous that I won't sleep anyway. I'm sure that for the first night that I sleep on the open water it will be someplace close to shore although that just probably makes it more likely that you could get hit because of more traffic.
    It's also important that you be seen - and sometimes it takes more than a white anchor light. You might want to look into installing a radar reflector as well as an anchor alarm. Egmont is close to a shipping lane, and even the bayside is exposed to fairly 'big' water. There are numerous areas not far off, like Terra Ceia Bay that might offer better choices of protected anchorages.

    We've done some fishing, boating and sailing in that area - sad to say, we once sank a boat just off the beach on
    Egmont...due to poor anchoring practices...but that's a story for another day. Long ago Egmont Key was a cool place to spend the day and explore the forts. There were some creepy 'bunkers' inland a little - though it's been years since we've been there.

    Personally, I would look for a more protected, secure anchorage nearby.
    I find my peace out on the sand...Beside the sea, not beyond or behind. R.A. Britt

    http://forums.floridasportsman.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=344&dateline=13073685  84

  4. #14
    Senior Member finbully's Avatar
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    Iíll add to my earlier response and clarify.
    I would not go offshore with the intention of overnighting without an anchor alarm, flares, air horn, high intensity lights, a PLB and radar.
    I also would not go without the ability to have a deck watch. That is, we would all not be sleeping at the same time.
    Iíve been overnighting for more than 40 years and not once without what I have mentioned above.
    Itís not absolutely necessary to drop anchor depending on where you are - you can drift with or without sea anchor(s).

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDude727 View Post
    Finally purchased a boat with a cabin that I want to do some overnight trips on. Having never done this before, I'm a little bit nervous about what I need to do to avoid trouble. About all I know is that I need to anchor up away from any shipping channel and make sure that I have 360 degree lights on. Is there anything else I can do to allow me to sleep soundly? Should I be saving my money for a radar that would sound an alarm when a vessel gets close? Any and all tips are appreciated for a rookie overnighter. Thank you!
    Depending on the time of year DEEP WOODS OFF! The no-see-ums will eat you up.

    If you have a generator make sure you have a co2 monitor.

    If you want a good nights sleep drink Rum.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDude727 View Post
    Finally purchased a boat with a cabin that I want to do some overnight trips on. Having never done this before, I'm a little bit nervous about what I need to do to avoid trouble. About all I know is that I need to anchor up away from any shipping channel and make sure that I have 360 degree lights on. Is there anything else I can do to allow me to sleep soundly? Should I be saving my money for a radar that would sound an alarm when a vessel gets close? Any and all tips are appreciated for a rookie overnighter. Thank you!
    don't worry too much....you'l be safe the 1 time you do it

  7. #17
    Senior Member Salty Dawg44's Avatar
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    What distance do you plan on setting the radar alarm on while you are sleeping? Do you plan on getting up and plotting the course of each vessel that gets within a mile or two? Or maybe set it to a closer range, and not be able to get your anchor up in time to move.

    Having your wide stand watch will solve the problem for future nights.
    Pete


  8. #18
    Senior Member nightfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by finbully View Post
    I’ll add to my earlier response and clarify.
    I would not go offshore with the intention of overnighting without an anchor alarm, flares, air horn, high intensity lights, a PLB and radar.
    I also would not go without the ability to have a deck watch. That is, we would all not be sleeping at the same time.
    I’ve been overnighting for more than 40 years and not once without what I have mentioned above.
    It’s not absolutely necessary to drop anchor depending on where you are - you can drift with or without sea anchor(s).
    I agree with this. I wouldn't want to be in a boat offshore with everybody asleep.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReelPlumber View Post

    If you have a generator make sure you have a CO monitor.
    Many years ago we lost some friends who did not have a carbon monoxide detector on their boat. Husband and wife who left 3 kids orphaned. I installed two CO detectors on my cabin boat, but my wife would not spend a single night on our boat after that.

  10. #20
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    God with the advice people give on here - you probably shouldn't leave your house and if you do you better wear a life jacket, a sweater, bring some flares, some ice packs in case the sweater gets too hot, 7 compasses, 1 GPS, an EPIRB, a couple months of rations, and a few copies of your will.


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