9wt or 10wt for beach - Page 2
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  1. #11
    Junior Member
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    Aug 2016
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    I'm no expert but a 10wt will out cast a 9 wt. However my 10wt will wear my *** out, so I have to chose my shots. If you are going to be selective about shots a 10 is ideal. If you are going to cast a lot, lighter is better.
    It only takes one bite to turn a bad day into a great one.

  2. #12
    Senior Member lemaymiami's Avatar
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    Jun 2011
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    2,568
    As noted above - it's more about the size of the fly you're wanting to toss and the weather conditions that day... I've always advised anglers wanting to add a second rod to go two line sizes up (or down) from their primary rod - so if you have an 8wt a 10 is the best choice for a second rod ( or a 6wt if you're going lighter...). For those that want to have only one rod... a 9wt (but it will be a bit heavy for some things and a bit light for others..).

    For anglers on the west coast a 10 wt is probably more than they'd ever need on foot - but the Atlantic side with those easterly breezes (wind actually - and most days...) a 10 wt can be very handy. To give you some idea of what a 10wt is capable of - it's the go to rod I hand anglers anywhere we're using five to six inch flies (and with either big bead chain eyes or lead eyes...). We've taken a bunch of tarpon all the up to around 80lbs on nothing but a 10wt... For all my heavier rods (10wt on up) we're set up with a full intermediate fly line (a very slow sinking line that can be fished just under the surface - very handy when the surf is tossing your gear around a lot... or as deep as you want -by simply counting it down to the desired depth....). Those that try one of those intermediates soon learn that they actually cast better into the wind than any floating line....

    Although I keep a bunch of fly rods ready to go (from a 7wt all the up to a 12wt...) and with two reels for every line size (one that winds right hand the other winds left hand)..... you could probably do 90% of all your fly fishing with just an 8 and a 10wt.... We only haul out the heavier rods for big silver or sharks...

    Hope this helps.
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    65
    I beach fish a lot . Being 8/9 w but I like 10' length in both rods for the beach , but in the back bay , estuary 9' or even 8' is better .

  4. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    5
    +1 for 8 wt on the beach
    +1 for 10' on the beach

    The majority of the small male snook on the beach will be a bunch of fin on a 6 or 7, but every once in a while you see a yuuuuuuuuge fish cruising that will make you so glad you brought the 8 wt.

  5. #15
    Moderator Ol'DirtyCaster's Avatar
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by DUPPY View Post
    +1 for 8 wt on the beach
    +1 for 10' on the beach

    The majority of the small male snook on the beach will be a bunch of fin on a 6 or 7, but every once in a while you see a yuuuuuuuuge fish cruising that will make you so glad you brought the 8 wt.
    +1 for an 8wt on the beach, if conditions require an 8wt on the beach. An 8 isn't going to stop snook-zilla any faster than a 7 though.

    -1 for a 10' on the beach. It'll help you mend over the break, and you can pick up a little more line, but the swing weight of a longer rod combined with a density compensated line is going to be miserable. I'm 6'2" and 230lbs and I'm not a fan. Not to mention I have a 1096 (9'6" 10wt), and a 10' 9wt, and they're both odd rods that are no longer in production.

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