Advice for jellyfish stings - Page 3
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  1. #21
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    When I was a kid I was fishing off Daytona on a party boat, Al Kline's Snow White, and saw a Man O' War gas bag floating over my line. I reeled in and and a neon purple ribbon came up with the line, wrapped around the reel and, subsequently, my 12yo hand. The pain was intense as the mate poured vinegar over my hand. He explained the vinegar wouldn't stop the hurt - he was right!, but that it would keep it from getting worse. I never forgot that. I have encountered many jellyfish stings over the subsequent 35 years and always have a little vinegar on board.

  2. #22
    Moderator Fletch's Avatar
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    • Flush with seawater (never use fresh water) to remove any loose tentacles
    • Pick remaining off with a gloved hand or tweezers
    • Shave the area with a razor if you have one
    • Vinegar works okay but is typically reserved for Box jellies. NEVER put vinegar on a portugese man-o-war sting (the neon purple ribbon in the post above). Although they look similar, a PMW is not really a true jellyfish. It's a hydroid (colony) and vinegar will cause it to fire any unfired nematocysts.
    • Soak in HOT water for 30-90 minutes.

    Hot water (rather heat) is your friend on stinging organisms. This works for 99 percent of ocean critters that sting. 104 deg F is the point at which most of these proteins begin to break down. 110-112 deg F water is recommended. Essentially, as hot as you can stand without burning yourself. Engine exhaust is a quick and easy source of hot water. You can use chemical heat packs if you don't have access to hot water.
    "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women and Irish whiskey. The other ten percent, I'll probably waste..."
    -- Tug McGraw on getting a raise

    Get Down Fishing Charters - Port Canaveral, Florida

  3. #23
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    I did not know that. It was a long time ago, but I remember the vinegar feeling like a cup full of bee stings being poured over my hand. That is completely on line with what you posted above. I learned something new today!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fletch View Post
    • Flush with seawater (never use fresh water) to remove any loose tentacles
    • Pick remaining off with a gloved hand or tweezers
    • Shave the area with a razor if you have one
    • Vinegar works okay but is typically reserved for Box jellies. NEVER put vinegar on a portugese man-o-war sting (the neon purple ribbon in the post above). Although they look similar, a PMW is not really a true jellyfish. It's a hydroid (colony) and vinegar will cause it to fire any unfired nematocysts.
    • Soak in HOT water for 30-90 minutes.

    Hot water (rather heat) is your friend on stinging organisms. This works for 99 percent of ocean critters that sting. 104 deg F is the point at which most of these proteins begin to break down. 110-112 deg F water is recommended. Essentially, as hot as you can stand without burning yourself. Engine exhaust is a quick and easy source of hot water. You can use chemical heat packs if you don't have access to hot water.
    I had heard on here that heat was the way to go as well. Breaking down the proteins with hot water if you can stand it. not sure how hot of water a 7yr old can stand though.
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.

  5. #25
    Moderator Fletch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soda Popinski View Post
    I had heard on here that heat was the way to go as well. Breaking down the proteins with hot water if you can stand it. not sure how hot of water a 7yr old can stand though.
    Test on an uninjured body part to ensure the victim can gauge the pain of the hot water appropriately. I have been stung by a box jelly that is "common" in the Caribbean and up the east coast of Florida to the Carolinas. Simplest way to describe it is 240 volts that won't go away. Hot water had the pain under control within minutes. IT WORKS!
    "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women and Irish whiskey. The other ten percent, I'll probably waste..."
    -- Tug McGraw on getting a raise

    Get Down Fishing Charters - Port Canaveral, Florida

  6. #26
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    Not to go off topic but do the same recommendations go for stingrays? I saw this kid screaming bloody murder after he stepped on one. I've heard other stories about people getting hit by them and going into shock and having to make a trip the hospital. I consider myself lucky that I never stepped on one after years of wading barefooted.

  7. #27
    Moderator Fletch's Avatar
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    Yes. It should work to break down the toxins injected by the ray's barb. Having said that, I've never been popped by a ray so I can't give first hand input. I have heard that sting ray envenomations can be downright horrible. There's a puncture wound to consider as well as simply breaking down the toxin with heat.

    Steve Irwin probably would have lived had he not yanked the barb out of his heart. In fact, there was an elderly gentleman down in the Palm Beach, Florida area that suffered an almost identical puncture from a spotted eagle ray a few years back. He left the barb in place (it had pierced his heart - same as Steve Irwin) and he survived.
    "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women and Irish whiskey. The other ten percent, I'll probably waste..."
    -- Tug McGraw on getting a raise

    Get Down Fishing Charters - Port Canaveral, Florida

  8. #28
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    I keep a spray bottle filled with vinegar on my boat at all times. When stung, flush/spray with vinegar ... then take disposable razor and shave the area where you were stung...this will remove any small stinging cells that you cant see with the naked eye....re-apply the vinegar.
    For more serious venomous stings immersing the area in hot water will also reduce the pain. Hot water can be obtained quickly by disconnecting your outboard's flushing hook up...the ocean water will heat up as it cools your power head and give you plenty of hot water. (Or using a JetBoil type of product)

    Just my $0.02 learned from being a rescue diver, master diver, and DAN certified diving emergency care provider.

  9. #29
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    I want to know if the heat will work on yellow fly bites. Twice in the past week i've gotten bitten by those little B@stards and they hurt like heck. I forgot about the heat until i read this thread. Might try tonight.
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.

  10. #30
    Senior Member NSB Photog's Avatar
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    Soaking in hot water is your best bet.

    Additionally, whenever I get stung I grab a handful of sand and scrub the area. Helps remove any remaining particles and for some reason the act of maniacally scrubbing is somewhat soothing.

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