Smoked Mullet?

NatureCoastGuideNatureCoastGuide Homosassa, Ceder Key FloridaPosts: 10 Greenhorn
Anyone know the trick on Smoking Mullet? I have had it several times prepared by others and loved it. When I have tried to make it, TERRIBLE. Trying to find the trick.
Sheila Morgan
Nature Coast Guides
www.naturecoastguides.com

Replies

  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 2,079 Captain
    Don’t smoke it too hot (180-200). Rub with salt pepper and brown sugar.  
    You should have been here yesterday
  • NatureCoastGuideNatureCoastGuide Homosassa, Ceder Key FloridaPosts: 10 Greenhorn
    Thanks Saltygatorvet.. How Long do you smoke it for?
    Sheila Morgan
    Nature Coast Guides
    www.naturecoastguides.com
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 811 Officer
    I know just enough to get myself in trouble.
    I have had it really good and really bad.
    soak in a salt brine, how long depends on how salty you prefer.
    30 minutes at least.
    dry it off and season.
    brown sugar, pepper, old bay, garlic powder and paprika.
    160 to180 in the smoker for 11/2 to 2 hours.
    The people that make it really good have spent years perfecting it. They will understandably not share much.

    for me the salt is the tricky part.
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • NatureCoastGuideNatureCoastGuide Homosassa, Ceder Key FloridaPosts: 10 Greenhorn
    Thanks 4Ward! Im going to give it a try. Ill keep you posted..
    Sheila Morgan
    Nature Coast Guides
    www.naturecoastguides.com
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 22,526 AG
    I have a book on smoking Florida fish and the guy says 8-9 hours at 115 degrees. Baste with butter several times and salt after basting. Salt is a major key to good smoking. Honestly though, I tried some mackerel and they were tasty with great smoke flavor but mushy. Is that mackerel versus mullet? And keeping a smoke fire at 115 is hard. I used bay wood.


    133cbf2b243368b1ddb2f591a1988076--beach-posters-florida-travel.jpg
  • fish_stixfish_stix Posts: 1,246 Officer
    Cyclist: where are you getting the bay wood?

  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 2,079 Captain
    edited June 3 #8
    I brine also. Simple brine cup kosher salt and I cup packed brown sugar per gallon of water. I’d brine mullet fir 6-8 hours, pat dry put on racks in fridge for 6hrs to overnight. That forms a pellicle, a lacquer like film., It holds rub and really soaks up smoke. I usually smoke around 180. I do have a cold smoker, but I don’t find it’s worth the time. And it is impossible to smoke with a traditional smoker at 115 in the summertime. The smoker is probably 115 without a fire. If albumen leaks out, your smoking to fast. For mullet probably about 3-4 hrs at 180. Good luck. I do Spanish, cobia, aj and salmon the same way 
    You should have been here yesterday
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 22,526 AG
    edited June 4 #9
    fish_stix said:
    Cyclist: where are you getting the bay wood?

    My yard. There are lots of bay trees all over Florida depending on the habitat.

    Any of the Perseas work.

    This link will take you to the general page. Type in Persea and you will get the species that occur in Florida and a map of the counties.


    133cbf2b243368b1ddb2f591a1988076--beach-posters-florida-travel.jpg
  • ChonggChongg Posts: 343 Deckhand
    Cyclist said:
    I have a book on smoking Florida fish and the guy says 8-9 hours at 115 degrees. Baste with butter several times and salt after basting. Salt is a major key to good smoking. Honestly though, I tried some mackerel and they were tasty with great smoke flavor but mushy. Is that mackerel versus mullet? And keeping a smoke fire at 115 is hard. I used bay wood.


    Where did you find this book?
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 22,526 AG
    Chongg said:
    Cyclist said:
    I have a book on smoking Florida fish and the guy says 8-9 hours at 115 degrees. Baste with butter several times and salt after basting. Salt is a major key to good smoking. Honestly though, I tried some mackerel and they were tasty with great smoke flavor but mushy. Is that mackerel versus mullet? And keeping a smoke fire at 115 is hard. I used bay wood.


    Where did you find this book?
    I couldn't tell you. Probably at a library sale in Gville.

    Found this though. Ignore the review (useless in the modern world). Neat book.

    133cbf2b243368b1ddb2f591a1988076--beach-posters-florida-travel.jpg
  • ChonggChongg Posts: 343 Deckhand
    Thanks man! 
  • permit_mepermit_me Posts: 847 Officer
    i prefer to soak mine in a brine overnite. rather than brown sugar, i use maple syrup. 8 to 10 hrs @ 140 to 150 and use apple wood chips.  Then i make a cream cheese based dip...and an ice cold beer.
  • andrewthe1andrewthe1 Posts: 574 Officer
    permit_me said:
    i prefer to soak mine in a brine overnite. rather than brown sugar, i use maple syrup. 8 to 10 hrs @ 140 to 150 and use apple wood chips.  Then i make a cream cheese based dip...and an ice cold beer.
    I am trying to work over here...and drooling in the office is frowned upon LOL
    we need more internet money
  • lmbrjacklmbrjack old townPosts: 4 Greenhorn
    I brin also 1/4 cup canning salt 1/3 cup brown sugar 1 quart water soak overnight rinse off put lemon pepper on filet smoke for 1 1/2- hours or till done at 180 on the trawler grill injoy 
  • lmbrjacklmbrjack old townPosts: 4 Greenhorn
    Sorry sorry I put traeger not trawler phone changed it
  • DropTheHammerDropTheHammer East CoastPosts: 348 Deckhand





    We all new what we were doing until DropTheHammer showed up.
  • smhsmh Posts: 216 Deckhand
    I haven't smoked mullet in a while, but I recently turned out a good batch of smoked Spanish Mackerel.  It was good by itself, but I made it into dip.  Anyway, I brine the fillets in a mix of brown sugar and kosher salt (about 1 cup of each in a gallon of water).  I usually grind up some black pepper and sometimes throw in some Old Bay for kicks (no measurements).  Soak the fish for 6-8 hours or overnight (depending on your desired level of saltiness).  After brining, rinse the fillets briefly in cold running water to get rid of the excess salt.  There's really no good way to describe how much of a rinse to do.  You want some saltiness, but not too much...so experiment.  After rinsing, shake the excess water from the fillets and place on wire racks on the counter.  With paper towel, pat the fillets dry.  Let them dry at room temperature for an hour or so.  At this time, you can sprinkle any additional seasoning on the fillets.  This drying will cause a pellicle to form (the tougher covering on the meat's surface).  It also allows the meat to warm up to ambient temperature.  I don't generally like to grill or smoke cold meat, regardless of what it is.  I have an electric Little Chief smoker with a plug-in heating element in the bottom.  It's simply a plug and go operation.  There is no way to regulate temperature, and it's a unit designed mainly for smoking fish, jerky, and other smaller items.  I don't think it would get hot enough to fully cook a thicker item like a whole chicken or Boston butt.  You could probably use it to add smoke and then finish it on a hotter cooking apparatus.  Fill the wood chip pan with your choice of chips (I like Alder), and place your fillets on the racks inside the smoker.  Close the unit up and let it do its thing.  You'll have to keep an eye on it and add new chips after the old ones turn to ash and stop producing smoke.  You might also want to rotate the racks up or down, as the ones closest to the heating element will receive more heat.  You just have to keep checking the meat occasionally for your desired level of "done-ness".  The length of time it takes to reach that point depends on several factors including the thickness of the fillets and the weather conditions.  It works best on warm, dry days.
  • abdulsaid8888abdulsaid8888 usaPosts: 6 Greenhorn
    edited July 14 #19
    spam deleted
  • FlashFlash Posts: 11,031 AG
    No brine for us. Just black pepper, little salt, cayenne, onion powder and some more black pepper. For straight eating at temps of 210 or so, we go 3 hours. For dips, 3 1/2 hours for a bit drier fish. Wood of choice Pecan/Cherry mix.


    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

    Never seem more learned than the people you are with. Wear your learning like a pocket watch and keep it hidden. Do not pull it out to count the hours, but give the time when you are asked. --- Lord Chesterfield
  • FishesmanFishesman Posts: 406 Deckhand
    The cookbook recommended by Cyclist is excellent. I found a used copy on Amazon a few years back for $0.99.

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