Spot and Stalk footwear

dredonndredonn Posts: 36 Greenhorn
I'm still learn how to do it right, I wear water boots but I'm told they make too much noise and that I should try sneakers. But whenever it's flooded that would be miserable to wear, a guys says he goes barefoot but that just not happening. So I'm trying to find an alternative and I'm thinking about trying those shoes that look like feet, I think they'll protect my feet while still being quieter than boots, hopefully not as miserable to walk around in as sneakers if they get wet, here's a link to the one I've been looking at.



I'm checking if anyone has any experience with these or any better alternatives so I can actually sneak up on an animal next time.

Replies

  • PinmanPinman Posts: 1,298 Officer

    Ive worn Jungle Boots.

    But whatever keeps the wind in your face works really well so I hear.


  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 485 Deckhand
    I don't know about those fila's but I made the mistake of wearing my vibrams down in Big Cypress once.  Destroyed them.  They already had a few years on them, but that one outing really ruined them.

    I've got an awesome pair of Scuba Pro booties.  Super thick soles.  I use them to wade fish and walk right over oyster beds with them.  I was gonna try them next season but I didn't think about the squishy noisyness of them.

    I've always been fine wearing sneakers when I know my feet are doomed to be wet.  No problems.  Several members on here recommend jungle boots, so I might give those a go too.
  • dredonndredonn Posts: 36 Greenhorn
    Pinman said:

    Ive worn Jungle Boots.

    But whatever keeps the wind in your face works really well so I hear.


    How do those jungle boots feel whenever water gets in them?
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 485 Deckhand
    Advice is to puncture a few holes near the soles for drainage
  • dredonndredonn Posts: 36 Greenhorn
    spangler said:
    Advice is to puncture a few holes near the soles for drainage


    Yea I was checking them out online and they didn't look like it takes much to flood them.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 1,867 Captain

    dredonn, opinions are like rear-ends----everybody has one!

    I'm going to pass this on to you for whatever you think its worth, and the source of my knowledge on this is well over 40 years of working in the woods of the Deep South in about all aspects of forest and wildlife management. First off, here in Florida you're eventually going to get water in your footwear and I know that you know this: But that's a minor situation. I, and virtually all other woods workers that I've known simply wore light-weight leather boots. For many years all that I wore were "Russell Bird Shooters" which are a light-weight leather boot, and I only laced it up about half way. Most woods workers will only lace up their boots about half way, and if you will try this you'll stick with it I bet. (Bird Shooters are not cheap, but these boots will last for years if properly taken care of and oiled.) And OILED is something else that I'll pass on to you for whatever you think its worth!

    Keep your leather boots well oiled with DEER TALLOW and no, you can't buy it, but its very simple to extract from the next deer that you bust! Simply cut the fat out of the deer and render it down over low heat in a pan on top of the stove--or on your outside grill if your wife raises hell with you about doing it on the stove ;-)! You're not going to find much fat on a deer (usually) but there will always be some around the kidneys and this makes excellent tallow. (This is called Leaf-Fat around my home up in the Mountains, but why I don't know). When it renders down to a liquid (low heat!) pour it into a Mason Jar, seal it, and it will never go rancid. It'll solidify, naturally, but simply scoop it out of the jar and rub it all over the boots working it into the leather. Or heat it up and brush it into the leather. It'll be easy and simple! Deer tallow will also have the added advantage of helping mask your odor when you're walking through the woods. I have "honest-to-God" cruised timber and had deer trail me maybe a hundred yards or so behind me smelling the tallow off my boots. 

     

  • PinmanPinman Posts: 1,298 Officer
    edited May 23 #8
    dredonn said:
    Pinman said:

    Ive worn Jungle Boots.

    But whatever keeps the wind in your face works really well so I hear.


    How do those jungle boots feel whenever water gets in them?

    Jungle boots differ from Combat boots and have drain holes already.  They drain fast and your feet stay wet but I wear them when I know I'm going to walk in high water.  I first wore them on a week long canoe portage trip in Minn and Canada.
  • kci-miakci-mia Posts: 181 Deckhand
    I've worn jungle boots but make sure to get the real deal military jungle boots instead of the cheap imported one from Army Surplus stores for $19.  Believe me, it makes a world of difference in terms of comfort.  I've also worn high-top Converse when stalking and they are pretty comfortable and quiet.

  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 485 Deckhand
    Thanks for the tip!  I def was gonna just go to a surplus store.  I'll look for something of better quality now.  Also, didn't really know there was a 'jungle boot', I thought they were just combat boots.  Cool.
  • kci-miakci-mia Posts: 181 Deckhand
    There are many different types of military combat boots depending on the environment for which they were designed to be used in.  Jungle boot is just one of the types.
     
  • James243James243 Posts: 698 Officer
    edited May 24 #12
    I wear LL Bean 16" boot. I like the ankle mobility I have in them and the tread is not aggressive and makes a relatively small footprint. They are pretty good about keeping my feet dry if oiled well and wool socks help with moisture. There is some truth to claim that you can feel what's underfoot which can be good and bad. Overall I'm happy with them and have been wearing the same pair for over ten years. They have free shipping and free returns so it can't hurt to try them.

    BTW, I only lace them up to the first six holes so it doesn't take much to get them on and off  
  • dredonndredonn Posts: 36 Greenhorn

    dredonn, opinions are like rear-ends----everybody has one!

    I'm going to pass this on to you for whatever you think its worth, and the source of my knowledge on this is well over 40 years of working in the woods of the Deep South in about all aspects of forest and wildlife management. First off, here in Florida you're eventually going to get water in your footwear and I know that you know this: But that's a minor situation. I, and virtually all other woods workers that I've known simply wore light-weight leather boots. For many years all that I wore were "Russell Bird Shooters" which are a light-weight leather boot, and I only laced it up about half way. Most woods workers will only lace up their boots about half way, and if you will try this you'll stick with it I bet. (Bird Shooters are not cheap, but these boots will last for years if properly taken care of and oiled.) And OILED is something else that I'll pass on to you for whatever you think its worth!

    Keep your leather boots well oiled with DEER TALLOW and no, you can't buy it, but its very simple to extract from the next deer that you bust! Simply cut the fat out of the deer and render it down over low heat in a pan on top of the stove--or on your outside grill if your wife raises hell with you about doing it on the stove ;-)! You're not going to find much fat on a deer (usually) but there will always be some around the kidneys and this makes excellent tallow. (This is called Leaf-Fat around my home up in the Mountains, but why I don't know). When it renders down to a liquid (low heat!) pour it into a Mason Jar, seal it, and it will never go rancid. It'll solidify, naturally, but simply scoop it out of the jar and rub it all over the boots working it into the leather. Or heat it up and brush it into the leather. It'll be easy and simple! Deer tallow will also have the added advantage of helping mask your odor when you're walking through the woods. I have "honest-to-God" cruised timber and had deer trail me maybe a hundred yards or so behind me smelling the tallow off my boots. 

     


    Wow that's sounds interesting with the tallow, might have to try that if I ever shoot a deer, also thanks for all the info.


  • swampwalkerswampwalker Posts: 1,181 Officer
    James I also wear the Bean boots. They're very comfortable and quiet. They do a really good job keeping feet dry and if I go in to deep - like any boot they hold water. I just dump the water, ring out the socks and go again. I also wear snake chaps during warm days and never notice any discomfort. Mine also have a lot of miles and years on them (2 pair now). One pair is over thirty years old and have been resoled a few times. Leather treated with mink oil and lasts forever. 
    The original - "Renaissance Redneck"
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 5,183 Admiral
    40 in years in the Glades...this works.
    If your afraid to get and keep your feet wet down here...better take up golf..
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • dredonndredonn Posts: 36 Greenhorn
    40 in years in the Glades...this works.
    If your afraid to get and keep your feet wet down here...better take up golf..
    What king of boots are those?
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 5,183 Admiral
    Their not boots..
    Rubber Booties with drain holes drilled in them and snake leggings
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 3,646 Captain
    dredonn said:
    I'm still learn how to do it right, I wear water boots but I'm told they make too much noise and that I should try sneakers. But whenever it's flooded that would be miserable to wear, a guys says he goes barefoot but that just not happening. So I'm trying to find an alternative and I'm thinking about trying those shoes that look like feet, I think they'll protect my feet while still being quieter than boots, hopefully not as miserable to walk around in as sneakers if they get wet, here's a link to the one I've been looking at.



    I'm checking if anyone has any experience with these or any better alternatives so I can actually sneak up on an animal next time.

    I would judge your friends advice by his success rate, and foot condition.
    Spot and stalk means you can't be focused on your feet as there are to many other things to consider.
    I'm of the opinion that if you have gravitated to this method, you need to hone your skills, spot and stalk is a last resort technique in most areas. Unless your hunting with hand grenades, find another method.
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway. nj
  • kci-miakci-mia Posts: 181 Deckhand

    I'm of the opinion that if you have gravitated to this method, you need to hone your skills, spot and stalk is a last resort technique in most areas. Unless your hunting with hand grenades, find another method.


    I have to disagree.  My preferred method for hunting hogs is spot and stalk.  It's much more challenging and a lot more fun.  It does take a lot more experience as you'll have to know where to look for hogs on any give time.
  • mydixiewreckedmydixiewrecked Posts: 1 Greenhorn
    I wear Bass Pro tan Dive booties.  They work awesome. like neoprene socks with a soft rubber bottom. Your feet get wet but no weight to them or room for them to fill up with water.  They sell them in black as well but the sun will cook your feet in the black ones.
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 779 Officer
    40 in years in the Glades...this works.
    If your afraid to get and keep your feet wet down here...better take up golf..
    Have you ever been bitten by a snake?  What advantage do they offer when under water?

    i just wear waders and pray I don’t step on gators over 9 feet. 

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