What's your favorite type of concrete anchor?

TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 9,361 Admiral
A man has to know is limitations. Home improvement is one of mine. Tapcons? Expanding type bolts? It's all Greek to me! Hopefully one of you can help...

I'm putting up some shelves in my garage to store some of the crap I've accumulated over the years. The shelves are to be anchored in a sold reinforced concrete beam. Not a cinder block structure, but rather a solid cross member supporting the concrete 2nd floor of my home. It's about two feet tall.

My question is how to best anchor the shelving to the beam....as the bolts (and instructions) that came with assume you will be anchoring it into studs in a wall.

I've done some research, but I'm still not quite sure how to best anchor the screws/bolts that support the shelves into the beam, and thus my question and this thread.

Here's a picture of the system I'm installing, in case that helps....

Rhino%20Mini%20Shelf%2020in%20Dimensions.jpg

What would you suggest?

Thanks in advance...Mike

Replies

  • PolarPolar Lake WorthPosts: 22,262 AG
    tap cons, unless you plan on putting 500 pounds up on it
  • ResinheadResinhead Posts: 8,762 Admiral
    Titans for heavier loads.
  • mplspugmplspug Lake Mary, FloridaPosts: 5,713 Admiral
    Rebar

    Captain Todd Approves

  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 670 Officer
    Tapcon Hex heads, You are going to want a hammer drill if you have a lot to put in.
    If you will never use it again go to Harbor Freight and buy one for $25 with a $5 replacement warranty, 1 or 2 might get the job done.
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 9,361 Admiral
    Two votes for Tapcons, and an interesting suggestion of Titans (reading more about them now, and apparently the guy who replaced my garage door used them, or something similar). The rebar comment has me a bit confused, but one must consider the source. :)

    But the hell with that! I think I just got an excuse to buy more power tools!

    This might end up not being as bad as I thought....
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 670 Officer
    or these
    C1.jpg 22.4K
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • PolarPolar Lake WorthPosts: 22,262 AG
    what are your thoughts on double sided tape?
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 7,399 Admiral
    Tapcons work. But a hilti gun is much more fun to work with and IMO does a better job.
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 670 Officer
    Polar wrote: »
    what are your thoughts on double sided tape?

    That is for these

    And plastic costumes.
    C2.jpg 19.8K
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,219 Admiral
    And here I was thinking you were talking about disposable boat anchors. We've used cinder blocks to anchor up next to jetties but if you find and old washing machine they used be be balanced with concrete rings. Those work great where as cinder blocks can break.. :wink
    "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." F. Scott Fitzgerald

    "Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." Niels Bohr
  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 3,413 Captain
    Tarponator wrote: »
    A man has to know is limitations. Home improvement is one of mine. Tapcons? Expanding type bolts? It's all Greek to me! Hopefully one of you can help...

    I'm putting up some shelves in my garage to store some of the crap I've accumulated over the years. The shelves are to be anchored in a sold reinforced concrete beam. Not a cinder block structure, but rather a solid cross member supporting the concrete 2nd floor of my home. It's about two feet tall.

    My question is how to best anchor the shelving to the beam....as the bolts (and instructions) that came with assume you will be anchoring it into studs in a wall.

    I've done some research, but I'm still not quite sure how to best anchor the screws/bolts that support the shelves into the beam, and thus my question and this thread.

    Here's a picture of the system I'm installing, in case that helps....

    Rhino%20Mini%20Shelf%2020in%20Dimensions.jpg

    What would you suggest?

    Thanks in advance...Mike

    It's called a "bond beam"...FYI

    I would use this.
    http://www.powers.com/pdfs/mechanical/7400SD.pdf
    Or this..
    http://www.powers.com/pdfs/mechanical/minidropin.pdf
    You're going to need a "real drill" to install either...
    I don't like tapcons....I have seen them pull out.

    There are several manufacturers with very similar anchors...
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway. nj
  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 6,904 Admiral
    wedge anchors are the way to go
    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
  • cadmancadman Home of the Gators Posts: 23,394 AG
    i have used Tapcons without any issue in concrete. They can pull out depending on several factors, the weight supported, any vibrations to the concrete, how old the concrete is, etc, etc.

    If you want to be 100% sure use a wedge anchor. Once you set them properly, they ain't coming out.

    The other option is one I had to take for one project. Drill all the way through and use a bolt,nut, and washers. But that was concrete block.

    Also, Hammer drill is the only way to drill into concrete. Buy a good one, you won't regret it. Used mine many times.

    Mini Mart Magnate

  • stc1993stc1993 Albany, GA Carrabelle, FLPosts: 4,347 Captain
    I've always used 1/4" drive pins or 1/4" wedge anchors. Drive pins are easiest you just drill your hole with the supplied drill bit. Take a hammer and drive them in. Never had one to fail.
  • pottydocpottydoc Posts: 1,840 Captain
    How much weight are you talking about? If it's a couple hundr d pounds or less, tap cons will be fine. Probably would be with way more weight than that. If you want to make really sure, use Red Heads (wedge anchors). If this actually a solid beam, just buy tap crocs that are 21/2-3".
  • S.S.TupperwareS.S.Tupperware Posts: 1,056 Officer
    Flip the shelf and use tapcons... your over thinking it.
  • HeatwaveHeatwave Posts: 1,958 Captain
    Back in the 80s when Hanging Transformers at Kimberly Clark and other places, we used the Lead Anchors and drive pin to set them... They were the shzt and you could easily remove a BOLT vs taking off a Nut. Down side was no support once the bolts were gone. Then, once I went to the steel plant it was a hole new ball game. We would use 1" all thread 12" deep in concrete and pour a bad **** epoxy mixer into the hole x 4. This was to support 7 ton, was not going anywhere...
    When hanging a Heavy picture on drywall, 5 plus pounds or more, I used a 1/4-20 toggle bolt, remove the toggle, run a 1/4-20 nut up the thread to the head of the bolt, slide on a washer, then a fender washer, put toggle back on and install, and tighten nut to depth needed. Works great for a large hanging and allows you to set the length of the bolt out from the wall.
  • PROFINITYPROFINITY Posts: 153 Deckhand
    I don't like the design/engineering you are using. Put supports under the shelf.
  • SpineymanSpineyman Posts: 7,580 Admiral
    Tarponator wrote: »
    A man has to know is limitations. Home improvement is one of mine. Tapcons? Expanding type bolts? It's all Greek to me! Hopefully one of you can help...

    The shelves are to be anchored in a sold reinforced concrete beam. Not a cinder block structure, but rather a solid cross member supporting the concrete 2nd floor of my home. It's about two feet tall.

    What would you suggest?

    Thanks in advance...Mike
    Kayak Rookie...and loving it.
    Fishing beautiful Destin / Ft Walton Beach area!
    II Chronicles 7:14

    if My people who are called by My name will humble themselves, and pray and seek My face, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin and heal their land.



  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 9,361 Admiral
    PROFINITY wrote: »
    I don't like the design/engineering you are using. Put supports under the shelf.

    No room. It's a cross beam about 2' tall against the ceiling. I could bolt it into the concrete floor above....but this is designed to be installed as pictured.

    After some testing, and for what it's worth, I'm going to go with 1/4" wedge bolts like this:

    trubolt-wedge-anchor-zinc_1_375.jpg

    They're rated for about 1k lbs each -- far above tapcons and titen bolts -- and by my calculations they should be more than strong enough for the load I intend to put on them (and there are 2 bolts per support member).

    I'll take a pic once compete -- still doing the other carpentry project so it'll be a few days yet before I get back to this project -- and I thank you all sincerely for the help.

    The next question is if I'll need a hammer drill or of I can get away with my old Milwaukee standard electric drill -- the standard drill worked fine during my test, even if it took a while to drill the holes...Mike

    p.s. it's not easy to drill through rebar reinforcements...I'll have to be careful to stay clear of them when I do the final holes...and I wonder aloud if there's any way to locate the rebar before drilling.
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 21,990 AG
    Tarponator wrote: »
    A man has to know is limitations. Home improvement is one of mine. Tapcons? Expanding type bolts? It's all Greek to me! Hopefully one of you can help...

    I'm putting up some shelves in my garage to store some of the crap I've accumulated over the years. The shelves are to be anchored in a sold reinforced concrete beam. Not a cinder block structure, but rather a solid cross member supporting the concrete 2nd floor of my home. It's about two feet tall.

    My question is how to best anchor the shelving to the beam....as the bolts (and instructions) that came with assume you will be anchoring it into studs in a wall.

    I've done some research, but I'm still not quite sure how to best anchor the screws/bolts that support the shelves into the beam, and thus my question and this thread.

    Here's a picture of the system I'm installing, in case that helps....

    Rhino%20Mini%20Shelf%2020in%20Dimensions.jpg

    What would you suggest?

    Thanks in advance...Mike



    anchor some 2x4s (not really - ha ha more like 1 and something by 2 and something) to the concrete with tapcons then screw your shelves to the 2x4s.
    133cbf2b243368b1ddb2f591a1988076--beach-posters-florida-travel.jpg
  • PROFINITYPROFINITY Posts: 153 Deckhand
    Sheer vs. tensile strength is my concern. Have you considered a heavy gauge shelving unit from a store like Sam's Club? They are inexpensive and have significant load capacity.
  • PROFINITYPROFINITY Posts: 153 Deckhand
    BTW- If you are close to Stuart, I can loan you a cordless hammer drill that will do the job.
  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 19,979 AG
    24077641_1.jpg?v=8D3277318D97A40
    :BUNNY gestapo

  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 9,361 Admiral
    PROFINITY wrote: »
    Sheer vs. tensile strength is my concern. Have you considered a heavy gauge shelving unit from a store like Sam's Club? They are inexpensive and have significant load capacity.

    I'm hoping not to have that concern. The ones I bought are made in the USA products with very good reviews (but they are a bit pricey compared to some).

    http://www.rhinoshelf.com/

    Now that I have them in hand, they do seem to be a quality product made of steel and then painted....Mike

    p.s. I'm over in Tampa -- a bit too far to drive to Stuart -- but I do appreciate the offer to borrow your hammer drill.
  • King_MeKing_Me Posts: 5,166 Admiral
    A good friend of mine has been in the biz for over 50 years, he has always recommened the Red Head brand..

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