Photographing your kills

2

Replies

  • GrillaGGrillaG Posts: 1,259 Officer
    1. ok, i can do that(i think)
    2.not gonna happen, i just drug it down a muddy trail in the dark, when i threw it up in the bed blood spurted everywhere, clean it up ? hahhahahahahaha
    3.u want me to get down in the mud with it ? gonna pass on that
    4.sounds nice, hmmmmm
    5.is flashlight ok ?
    6.cloudy yea but it was raining too, after my glasses fogged up i cudn't see crap !
    7.flash ? another great idea
    8.an abandoned farmhouse ? haha, might get to shoot a crackhead
    9.it's dark, it's raining, i'm sweatin balls, skeeters are swarming, i'm tired, i'm hungry, c'mon man hurry up
    10.see #9

    I will try to do better in the future(maybe). Altho..........I kinda like the bloody tailgate pics, lol
  • motoelfmotoelf Posts: 80 Deckhand
    Yea, I'm with GrillaG on this one so I guess I'll say I suck as a dead animal professional photographer! Sorry for those that found my last pic of the hog I shot offensive with the blood all over but I will say with the head shot the animal did not suffer and none of that meat went to waste! I dont see handy wipes being in my backback anytime soon.
  • BuckDaddyBuckDaddy Posts: 644 Officer
    He only has this Hero shot
    gaysuperheroes.jpg?t=1318108646

    And this hero shot....
  • james 14james 14 Posts: 2,832 Moderator
    I, for one, kinda miss Mike's pics of bucks he called in. Whether they were tame deer or not.
  • CptMikeCptMike Posts: 286 Officer
    First off blood is spilt when you kill an animal to eat it. Second, you are an anti hunter so to you seeing an animal as food is disrespect. To those who hunt and respect the animal as something that will become themselves there is no higher honor than killing something to eat. Gory? You don't want any posts on how to properly handle game with instructive photos? Like when people show pictures of fish being filleted and show stomach contents? You are deluded. This is not Disney, Nature is not Disney, and the real world of nature is far more savage, cruel and painful, oh and gory than anything on this website. Be gone you troll.
    8396f374.jpg

    From across the chasm………. Just maybe you can be helped.

    True, I don’t and won’t post photos of my own exploits or dead animals. Why? I have a well nourished ego and for those whose are malnourished……you can’t understand. Actually, after thinking about it, I have few photos of the many successful hunts I was privileged to have experienced. The “hunt” was all about the living animal and the challenge he or she presented. The experience is a private and privileged solitary interaction with a wild animal that is “all in” with its life. The hunt is never about some misguided glory measured in “registry”, points or the envious adoration of others. Hunting is an interaction with the earth, wild things and primal instincts that if done right with respect require no embellishments beyond the rewards of having had the experience. I owe the experience not to Gander Mountain, game cameras, graphite arrows, feeders (bait), technology, FS or any of the other gadgeters. I’m beholding to nature and wild things that provide the experience.

    With the complete commercialization and exploitation of both fishermen and hunters, for most, it is nearly impossible to find a QUALITY experience free from game and fish that haven’t been “hammered, busted, or slammed” fueled by “sportsman” who’s only shared sense of commitment to the resource is one of either competition or consumption. But then quality is a relative term measured today in how effectively marketing has brought you to the experience. Technology is not a genuine hunting experience. Nothing substitutes for interacting with wild animals on their terms with hunting skills that have been handed down for eons.
    Ted Kerosote, a Sports Afield columnist and author of books on hunting, says in an essay that this kind of macho hunter acts "with a callousness that debases everything hunters say about hunting’s being a sacred connection to our Paleolithic roots."
    Kerosote believes that reformation of hunting into an activity that lives up to its fair-chase ideals is the only way it will survive: "If hunters are going to preserve hunting, they must recreate it as the disciplined, mindful, sacred activity it once was for our species" — including a "mutual regard" between species.

    Now….we can have differences, even argue, but honor each other and respect the policy of exchanging ideas by articulating our message without calling names.

    Many here fear what they don’t understand, most of all, their own shortcomings and inadequacies and have to engage in personal attacks. Generally they are short on experience and knowledge unable to articulate their own ideas because they have none. There is a tendency, like bottom feeders in a frenzy, to congregate and attack in groups. Always… the same group. There continues to be a group, some self-promoters, who apparently short on vocabulary and intellect to articulate an argument or idea and resort to sophomoric posting of silly photos and personal attacks.

    Granted my messages are provocative and are intended to stimulate thought and are always respectful of the resource. I often document my messages from reputable sources with information that also challenges popular ideas.

    The future of hunting and sport hangs in the balance on how we embrace our responsibilities and not so much how we pursue our rights.

    Forkbrow.jpg
    The "redneck way".........just so long as something winds up dead.
  • StillinscrubsStillinscrubs Posts: 1,844 Officer
    CptMike wrote: »
    True, I don’t and won’t post photos of my own exploits or dead animals. Why? Because I don't hunt, I am against the idea of killing an animal for any reason.

    Fixed it for you. I would have respect for you if you showed up here and stated this.
    CptMike wrote: »
    Hunting is an interaction with the earth, wild things and primal instincts that if done right with respect require no embellishments beyond the rewards of having had the experience.

    Your idea of hunting is like a guy going to a strip club and thinking he has a relationship with any of the dancers. Hunting involves more than looking at a pretty animal and thinking "deep" thoughts.
    CptMike wrote: »
    Technology is not a genuine hunting experience.

    So you are giving up the camera and going to stone and chisel?
    CptMike wrote: »

    Now….we can have differences, even argue, but honor each other and respect the policy of exchanging ideas by articulating our message without calling names.

    Many here fear what they don’t understand, most of all, their own shortcomings and inadequacies and have to engage in personal attacks.

    As long as you don't call people names the broad generalizations are ok. You fight in a psychological manner much like a woman would, you have no "physical" superiority so you sling BS and hope to score points.
    CptMike wrote: »
    There is a tendency, like bottom feeders in a frenzy, to congregate and attack in groups.

    Are you calling sharks bottom feeders? Since I know of no other animals that feed in a frenzy. Or is your limited knowledge of nature not allowing you to provide other examples for comparison. I could say that you are like a monkey in a cage throwing its feces at passers by, you know you can't do anything effective in this condition (we'll call it your life) so you throw the only thing you can produce that people will notice. And they avoid you.
    CptMike wrote: »

    Granted my messages are provocative and are intended to stimulate thought and are always respectful of the resource.

    No they do not. You come off as mentally ill. I would love to sit down with you and really get a diagnosis. Maybe you could get on some meds and become a productive member of society. There are plenty of kids out in the world that could use a role model who would show them about nature and how to feed themselves by hunting it. Or catching it with a fishing pole.
    CptMike wrote: »

    The future of hunting and sport hangs in the balance on how we embrace our responsibilities and not so much how we pursue our rights.

    At least you admit that hunting is a right....
  • AllenRAllenR Posts: 2,688 Captain
    motoelf wrote: »
    Yea, I'm with GrillaG on this one so I guess I'll say I suck as a dead animal professional photographer! Sorry for those that found my last pic of the hog I shot offensive with the blood all over but I will say with the head shot the animal did not suffer and none of that meat went to waste! I dont see handy wipes being in my backback anytime soon.

    I think I speak for the whole forum in saying noone is offended in gory bloody pictures. Hell, we are all hunters. Blood is all part of it. We are killing animals

    The reason for this thread is to give tips to get a quality picture to go along with our kills. I read three Florida forums, and a Georgia forum and can't tell you how many times week after week I see pictures of kills that you can barely tell what is in the picture. I snap a lot of pictures, and try to get at least one pic of every kill that is "frame worthy". That all this is about, just take an extra 1 minute and try to get a good pic. Noone is offended except PETA, and, well, screw them...
  • CptMikeCptMike Posts: 286 Officer
    !
    The "redneck way".........just so long as something winds up dead.
  • CptMikeCptMike Posts: 286 Officer
    Fixed it for you. I would have respect for you if you showed up here and stated this.



    Your idea of hunting is like a guy going to a strip club and thinking he has a relationship with any of the dancers. Hunting involves more than looking at a pretty animal and thinking "deep" thoughts.



    So you are giving up the camera and going to stone and chisel?



    As long as you don't call people names the broad generalizations are ok. You fight in a psychological manner much like a woman would, you have no "physical" superiority so you sling BS and hope to score points.



    Are you calling sharks bottom feeders? Since I know of no other animals that feed in a frenzy. Or is your limited knowledge of nature not allowing you to provide other examples for comparison. I could say that you are like a monkey in a cage throwing its feces at passers by, you know you can't do anything effective in this condition (we'll call it your life) so you throw the only thing you can produce that people will notice. And they avoid you.



    No they do not. You come off as mentally ill. I would love to sit down with you and really get a diagnosis. Maybe you could get on some meds and become a productive member of society. There are plenty of kids out in the world that could use a role model who would show them about nature and how to feed themselves by hunting it. Or catching it with a fishing pole.



    At least you admit that hunting is a right....

    Outstanding! You've most effectively corroborated each of my points. Thanks'. I must have nailed it.
    The "redneck way".........just so long as something winds up dead.
  • TrophyRoomAppTrophyRoomApp Posts: 172 Officer
    Great advice fly down
    Do You Hunt Or Fish & Own An iPhone? http://www.TrophyRoomApp.com
  • OVERENGINEEREDOVERENGINEERED Posts: 73 Deckhand
    Here is the best secrete to getting a good photo of your trophy.........take as many as you can stand! Most times I am by myself when hunting and fishing so I have to photograph myself. it's a little tough but it's possibe, you just have to take a lot to get that one special shot. It is not uncommon for me to take 75-100 pics. They can always be deleted but once the opportunity has past, that's it! If you only take 4-6 pictures, you will probably be disappointed. O.E.
  • FloridaODFloridaOD Posts: 2,985 Captain
    (deleted- I asked about how to post photos-I see there is specific FS forum for photo uploading etc.)
    Hunters are present yet relatively uncommon in Florida :wink
  • BentleyBentley Posts: 91 Deckhand
    Thanks for the tips.
  • flydownflydown Posts: 6,459 Admiral
    Here's a good example of getting down on the animal's level (or in this case, below the animal's level) to create impact.
    Notice how the photographer put the antlers in their own space to draw your attention to them.
    DYING for me was the most HE could do. LIVING for HIM is the least I can do
  • FlashFlash Posts: 11,024 AG
    AllenR wrote: »
    My most difficult thing is being by myself and trying to set up the self-timer. Seems to take forever to get a good shot

    This was one here on about my 8th attempt and was getting flustered

    IMG_2591.jpg

    Most of the cameras now our pretty high megapixels. Don't be afraid to "back out" more to make sure you get everything in the image you need. You can then crop in on it later to get your finished image.
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    Never seem more learned than the people you are with. Wear your learning like a pocket watch and keep it hidden. Do not pull it out to count the hours, but give the time when you are asked. --- Lord Chesterfield
  • omegafooomegafoo Posts: 3,100 Captain
    Nice shot John. Always enjoy seeing well taken and planned photos. Just wish more would put the time in to take a great photo like this!

    I would also say this is a good example of more than just getting to the deer's level.

    Notice how the deer should be cleaned up. No blood dripping from the mouth/nose. No blood around an entry/exit wound. Tongue not hanging out.

    Also notice in giving the antler's their own space that John's hands are not specifically holding the antlers so not to detract from them.
  • flydownflydown Posts: 6,459 Admiral
    I unapologetically stole this image from another thread to demonstrate a great use of available props.
    Note how he used tree stumps to prop the deers head up, which allowed the hunter to move away from the bucks antlers, giving them their own space.

    This is a great all around hero shot. Excellent pose, composition and lighting.
    DYING for me was the most HE could do. LIVING for HIM is the least I can do
  • TriplecleanTripleclean Posts: 6,591 Officer
    flydown wrote: »
    I unapologetically stole this image from another thread to demonstrate a great use of available props.
    Note how he used tree stumps to prop the deers head up, which allowed the hunter to move away from the bucks antlers, giving them their own space.

    This is a great all around hero shot. Excellent pose, composition and lighting.

    I mean you are so right in this one and belay my last.
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
  • duliferdulifer Posts: 180 Officer
    I may have missed it, but didn't see it mentioned in previous posts...don't forget the 2/3rds rule. If you want folks to focus attention on a certain spot in your photo, practice composition using the 2/3rds rule. And if you have a DSLR, and diverse lenses, use them; you can focus attention using depth of field...shoot with the F-stop that gives you the DOF you want. Hitch

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  • flydownflydown Posts: 6,459 Admiral
    dulifer wrote: »
    I may have missed it, but didn't see it mentioned in previous posts...don't forget the 2/3rds rule. If you want folks to focus attention on a certain spot in your photo, practice composition using the 2/3rds rule.

    Great point, Hitch. A great photograph always starts with sharp focus and great composition. And great composition starts with the rule of thirds.
    What is the rule of thirds, you ask? It is simply dividing the photograph in to thirds by two imaginary horizontal lines and two vertical lines. Here is a great example...



    Some SLR cameras have a rule of thirds grid on their focus screen, which makes composing a snap.
    Now that you know what the rule of thirds is, you probably want to know how to use it to create great images. Well, here's kinda how it's done.
    In the photograph above you can see the lines intersect at four points. These four intersections are important. If you look at a great photograph, you will almost always see a key element, or dominant subject in the photo at one of these intersections. Take a look at a great portrait. You will often see the models eyes (or dominant eye if it's a close up) on one of the top two intersections, rather than in the middle of the photo.

    On the great shot of Hitch's pup, you notice the eye of the pup is on the top left intersection. You also notice that one of the buckles of his pack leads your eye out of the frame. The buckle is a submissive subject in the photograph, but equally important as the dog, to make this photo great.
    DYING for me was the most HE could do. LIVING for HIM is the least I can do
  • flydownflydown Posts: 6,459 Admiral
    Post Work.

    Every Hunter/Photographer encounters a situation where we only have a limited amount of time to capture a great trophy shot.
    This was the case last weekend as I was blessed to not only photograph, but help drag out a great buck for a dear friend.
    The buck was shot in a memorable and beautiful location, and I wanted to capture the buck where he fell. So I drag my camera, and only my camera, back into the swamp where the buck lay.
    Upon arrival, I realized my mistake. I hadn't brought any water or a rag to clean the animal. And as you can see, he was a bit of a mess.



    Plus, my buddy isn't much of a poser, and doesn't really embrace the whole 'posing' idea, so I made our session short and sweet.
    But I knew I had a few hours ahead of me at the computer. Adobe Photoshop is a wonderful tool. If you don't have it, get it.
    Here is the result.
    DYING for me was the most HE could do. LIVING for HIM is the least I can do
  • tampaspicertampaspicer Posts: 196 Deckhand
    EVERYONE MAKE SURE YOU SMILE IN YOUR PICS!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • tarponnut2tarponnut2 Posts: 6 Greenhorn
    Good advice. It drives me crazy to see the photos that are taken looking down on a hunter and his trophy. It makes the game look small and the hunter big.
    I take the photos for my successful clients and they generally turn out well. I take 10 to 15 from all different angles.
    I also try and say something to crack them up, othwerwise you could get the dreaded "unhappy/too serious hunter"
    photo.You can be smiling and still be respectful of the animal, it's a celebration, not a funeral.
    Sit on your butt or lay on your stomach to take the hero pic.
  • tarponnut2tarponnut2 Posts: 6 Greenhorn
    I thought this was about taking good pictures of successful hunts. I'm tired of the "arguing" forums.
    I hope it's not like this all the time, yikes.
  • down4dacountdown4dacount Posts: 2,580 Officer
    EVERYONE MAKE SURE YOU SMILE IN YOUR PICS!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    YEAP !!!! Couldn't agree more
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    Full moons make me crazy and I go out and kill deer . Come to think all moon phases do that to me
    Check out my videos http://www.youtube.com/user/Down4dacount1?feature=mhee
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  • tampaspicertampaspicer Posts: 196 Deckhand
    YEAP !!!! Couldn't agree more

    Your The King of No Smiles. LOL
  • flydownflydown Posts: 6,459 Admiral
    Depth Of Field

    Okay.. First off, I apologize for stealing this image, but it is for good reason! It is a GREAT photograph that displays how the use of depth of field can completely change the feeling of a photograph.

    Here's one for the 35mm DSLR gang.

    This photograph that is a perfect example of how opening the aperture, and compressing the lens of your camera creates a shallow depth of field that will draw your eye to what matters. In this case it's the Buck's head and antlers. Nothing else is in sharp focus but what's important in this photograph. Not that you want to take every shot in this fashion, but taking a few like this adds impact.

    So open those apertures and compress those images, boys!
    DYING for me was the most HE could do. LIVING for HIM is the least I can do
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