Boat prices?

SuperMutuSuperMutu Posts: 119 Deckhand
I'm in the research phase...trying to decide what boat will fit.  Family-friendly fishing boat capable of maybe 40 miles offshore.

I'm thinking no less than 24'...but I don't know.  I don't want to rely on a salesman to tell me.

The thing that is sort of shocking are the prices of boats.  The are more boat dealers around my part of west central than car dealers.  And they all seem to be packed with six figure boats.  You don't see Ferrari dealers on every corner....so how are people affording these boats?

I make good money...not six figures, but close.  My wife makes descent money.  Do they finance boats differently?  I wouldn't think dealers would keep these boats in stock if they were not in demand.

Please educate me.


Replies

  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,168 Admiral
    Welcome to the hell that is the current boat market.   If you find anything remotely close to a decent deal, it's gone before you get there to look at it.   Do a LOT of research, look at a LOT of boats.   Figure out what kind of boat you need that best suits what you will be doing 90% of the time with it. 

    Don't just go out and buy a 24' CC because it's popular, it may not suit you needs or uses at all.   

    For financing, they'll go 15 years on boats, sometimes longer, and that's how Greg the Googan can afford that pathfinder with a 250 Yamaha so he can tear through @ANUMBER1 ; 's traps every afternoon.    

    Boating is a lot of fun, it's work, and it's not cheap, but getting out on the water is a blast, just know what you're doing before you go.   Good luck. 

    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • SuperMutuSuperMutu Posts: 119 Deckhand
    I'm at least a year away from buying.  For now I have to use Hubbard's or Gulfstar to scratch my itch.

    I see these Hanson boats....they look pretty nice.  I've also considered repowering a used boat.  Used Ranger 24's seem to be in my price range.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,168 Admiral
    SuperMutu said:
    I'm at least a year away from buying.  For now I have to use Hubbard's or Gulfstar to scratch my itch.

    I see these Hanson boats....they look pretty nice.  I've also considered repowering a used boat.  Used Ranger 24's seem to be in my price range.
    Hanson makes a good boat, but it's essentially a 23' skiff, there is not much deadrise and if you want to go out into deeper water it's not the best thing but on the gulf side, I think it's a great boat.  

    repowering an older boat is always an option just check on the transom and stringers. a new 4 stroke is going to be heavier than the older 2 strokes those boats were built to have on them.  It's good you are beginning to narrow down what you want, eliminate certain boats you know you don't and really hon in on 2-3 manufacturers and motors.   

    Talk to people, try to find forums for the specific boats you want and go on them and lurk.  

    I know there is a forum for the old Wellcraft V20's, been on there many times.  Most of the big boat builders will have dedicated forums somewhere on the internet.   
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,168 Admiral
    Stott Craft makes a 21' bay boat that is relatively inexpensive as well.  
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • shamrock1188shamrock1188 Posts: 230 Deckhand
    Some pay cash and can afford it. Most will finance for 15 years. Some with take out a home equity loans, most home  values have sky rocketed in the last few years. Not everybody is ridding around in a  six figure boat. Trump is in office the economy is doing great. If the economy collapses those six figure boats are the first thing to go. Also keep in mind the operating cost of a boat can be high also.






  • InstaGatorInstaGator Posts: 86 Greenhorn
    SuoerMuto, welcome to the boating community, pleasure and pain the same day.  For example I went out this am and engine would not start, probably a bad ignition switch.  Anyhow as far as your question a few things for us to know would be helpful as we think of options for yourself

    Questions:
    center console or do you need a cuddly?
    are you fishing in the Atlantic or Gulf
    what type of fishing do you do, trolling, bottom fish etc...
    do you have a general target range for price?
    will this be strictly an offshore boat or are you also wanting to do bay fishing?

    All this being said I do have a few opinions as I have owned boats for 30+ yrs and have done about everything to my boats, all the way to a total tear down to the stringers
    New is nice but like you said before the prices are just crazy!!
    I am not afraid of an older boat as long as it has a good hull
    That being said I have a 1987 28ft CC that is no Nigeria made but has a solid hull.  I put new power on it, new wiring, binacle and a few odds and ends and it is just fine (this boat is 31 yr old). I get complements constantly about and other than this morning had no significant issues.  I do take very good care of my boats and that is why I have so few issues but be aware that ALL boat owners will have something to happen to them.  Also make sure you get all of the safety equip and a towing package.  Best of luck
  • InstaGatorInstaGator Posts: 86 Greenhorn
    Additional thoughts.

    possible boats to consider
    Contender
    whitewater
    dorado
    regulator

    I would stay away from
    robalo
    wellcraft
    Mako

    anyone what to add to the list?
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,168 Admiral
    Additional thoughts.

    possible boats to consider
    Contender
    whitewater
    dorado
    regulator

    I would stay away from
    robalo
    wellcraft
    Mako

    anyone what to add to the list?
    Palm Beach seems to be a boat to put on the stay away from list as well.   
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • SuperMutuSuperMutu Posts: 119 Deckhand
    Man, I thought Robalo was a good brand?  I say that solely based on my memory as a kid watching fishing shows and the Robalo boat commercials "follow robalo".

    I think a walk around would provide some comforts to the family.  However, I am leaning towards a cc in the form of a bay boat.  As much as I would like to just head 50+ miles out I know that given my lack of experience it would not be wise.  

    I'm in the st Pete area, so primarily fishing the bay and near shore...possibly going further out as I get more comfortable. 

    I do not have a particular fishing style in mind.  Mostly bottom fishing I suppose.  

    I would like to stay under $50...that is very top end.  I will likely need to update electronics and if I'm in a bay boat I would definitely get a t motor that I can link up to the bottom machine. 


  • The Cat's EyeThe Cat's Eye Posts: 1,143 Officer
    If this is going to be your first boat i would take some boating and classes and work up to heading 40 miles offshore. Going that far out is not for greenhorns IMO. 
    Giimoozaabi
  • SuperMutuSuperMutu Posts: 119 Deckhand
    Yeah, I'm definitely taking courses.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,168 Admiral
    edited July 6 #13
    Tampa Bay is a great learning ground.  It can be as choppy as you'd ever want to fish, and as calm as glass, you can catch sheepshead, sharks, tarpon, reds, snook, macks, jacks, grouper, pretty much anything and everything.   Going 50 miles out isn't really necessary unless you are targeting red snapper, and it sounds like a long distance, but when you get out there, and you see there's 3-4 dozen other boats out there with you all on the same spots, you think heck, everyone goes out 50 miles.   

    a 22' bay boat imo would be a great all around fishing machine and family boat, T top is great but not 100% necessary, you can also trailer it pretty easily and head north to scallop or take it to the keys.   

    I don't know what happened to historically good boat builders I thought Wellcraft made the old V20s and they were legendary, Cobia used to be a good solid boat, same with Robalo but I guess quality took a back seat to cost cutting and mass production.    

    If you seriously are going to consider a used boat, look at the Sea Pro SV2100.   You can find them from 2002-2006 between 10k and 25k depending on how well they were maintained.   

    My first boat was a used one and i'm glad it was because I have had my share of mishaps at the ramp, bumped a piling or two and you would never notice on a 20year boat.   But on a brand new one you are going to agonize over every little ding and scratch.   Doesn't mean I'm haphazard with it just means you are going to learn things while boating.  
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • shamrock1188shamrock1188 Posts: 230 Deckhand
    What tow vehicle do you have. That will be a consternation on what size boat. I see a lot of overload vehicles towing boats and you don't want to rely on a car salesman to tell what you need. Look at the fine print "properly equipped"
  • andrewthe1andrewthe1 Posts: 568 Officer
    Additional thoughts.

    possible boats to consider
    Contender
    whitewater
    dorado
    regulator

    I would stay away from
    robalo
    wellcraft
    Mako

    anyone what to add to the list?
    I would take Wellcraft off the stay away from list, never had any issues!
    we need more internet money
  • InstaGatorInstaGator Posts: 86 Greenhorn
    I do not know much about what are some good bay boat brands other than to say they cost more than i think most are worth, i.e. pathfinder.  I gre up in the St Pete area and a 20 ft bay boat can fish that entire area, including up to 20 miles off shore on those flat summer days.  They are also easy to trailer for scallops just north of you or easy to take down to the keys for yellowtail snapper, tarpon, or dolphin.  I Dorado boats used to be made in that area and I know they are a solid boat and are not crazy expensive.  If I was in that area and I wanted Ed a 20 ft or so bay type boat that is what I would get.  You may also want to consider yellow fins. Though they may be a bit pricey.
  • PicmanPicman Posts: 55 Greenhorn
    edited July 6 #17
    B)  You may also want to consider yellow fins. Though they may be a bit pricey.   A bit You say?? B)  
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,168 Admiral
    Picman said:
    B)  You may also want to consider yellow fins. Though they may be a bit pricey.   A bit You say?? B)  
    What you don't have 70k for a 2013 boat?

    https://www.boattrader.com/listing/2013-yellowfin-21-hybrid-bay-103206032/?refSource=standard listing
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • pottydocpottydoc Posts: 2,051 Captain
    First rule, remember that most of the folks putting boats on the do not by list have never been on one of the listed, and get their info from posts on the internet. The same with people bad mouthing a particular brand of outboard. Alll of them break. And absolutely don't listen to,the "4 strokes better than two strokes in every way crowd".  A bay boat sounds like a great first boat for you. There's tons of them out there, with your budget you can easily buy a high mid tier boat a few years old. If you're not in a hurry, a boat show is a great way to,see lots of boats in a short time. You can spend several days at the big ones like Miami and Ft Lauderdale. Walk around on a bunch of them, and start narrowing your list. Figure out what's important to you and your family to have, like forward seating,  a head, large live wells, t top or Bimini, etc. Then start looking for boats that come close to what you want. 

    Insagstor, I once owned a 283 98 Mako. Covered titerally several thousand miles in it, and killed a pile of fish and lobster. Over 40 Bahama trips in it. Repwered it shortly after I bought it from Merc 225 EFI's to F225 Yamaha's. They were pretty much broken for the first 8 months I had it till someone told me what was wrong with them, and then I told Yamaha. Besides the motors, I had exactly ZERO issues with the boat. No wiring problems, no hull problems, no broken hinges or latches, nothing. While they're not the quality of the top their boats you listed, they are not a bad boat. And as far as it goes, the owners of the new Robolos  have pretty much nothing but good things to say about their boats. I have several buddies with high end (think YF and Reg), and both of them have had more stuff break on their boats than my old Mako. And for the OP's 50k budget, he isn't going to find anything on your list. 
  • The Cat's EyeThe Cat's Eye Posts: 1,143 Officer
    To try and answer the original post:

    In 1970 you could buy a 24 ft boat that was powered by a V8 engine and outdrive for about $6000. It would weigh over 4000 lb’s dry. (Using a inflation calculator $6000 in 1970 equals $38,905. and that would get you a much smaller boat at today’s prices.)

     Your 24 ft. boat did not come with an alum trailer, but probably sat on a break frame steel trailer that was not even galvanized.  Back then outboard engines were just not large enough to push these heavy hulls, so boats in this range would require two outboards to achieve the power of an auto marine converted gas engine.

     These 23-24 ft. boats had plywood core decks & transoms, and the thick fiberglass was hand laid up by unskilled workers if you were lucky, or they were cheaply glassed with chopper guns.  

     Then manufactures started to advance in boat building techniques and stepped up their game and stopped using wood cores and hand laid fiberglass, (for the most part ?)  In other words, boat building moved up to a higher technical level which is probably only one of the reasons prices rose. Then outboard engines became available in larger sizes and became technically complex. The down side is the prices of these high tech outboard engines skyrocketed.

     Maybe someone on this forum can explain why a large outboard engine costs as much as a compact car. (I would guess it has to do with mass production and the world demand for compact cars.)

     I would also think that any boat larger then a small alum jon boat are not mass produced like cars by robots on assembly lines, so production costs have pushed the prices up. Then of course boats are considered luxury items and that alone probably accounts for some of the higher prices we are seeing today.

    .


    Giimoozaabi
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,168 Admiral
    edited July 7 #21
    I want to jump in with another thing that IMO pushed boat prices higher, but I may be completely wrong.    Credit.   I don't think that 40 years ago anyone financed their boats for 15-20 years.  As quality rose, prices rose, and boats became more unaffordable, banks and manufacturers had to figure out how to make them still affordable, hence, crazy long loans.   With 15-20 year loans,  boat builders could make expensive boats and people would still be able to buy them.   
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • sigiiligansigiiligan Posts: 87 Greenhorn
    If 50K is your top end of what you want to spend then I'd suggest check out Dusky, or at least their website. Factory direct can save you some money, and they occasionally have boats on the website someone ordered but didn't pick up that they are willing to negotiate on. 
  • InstaGatorInstaGator Posts: 86 Greenhorn
    Pottydoc:

    interesting how everyone has a different experience on their boats.  I had a 1990 mako 231 and its design was **** poor.  I know this because when had to fix the cracking center console flange at the bottom of the CC I also decided to pull the fuel tank hatch and inspect the gas tank.  Once the tank pulled noticed the stringer were not full length or even came up to support the deck sole.  Also there were no bulk head supports and foam flotation spray job was a mess.  Many other design/build flaws noted as well.  When I fixed all of the above and more the boat had a totally different feel.  More solid and secure.  I think the pre 1990 mako’s are good boats but after my 1990 i would sear off Mako.  I have seen some of their 2000 models and the finish seems somewhat poor.  They may now be a better boat but like with most products/services you typically only have once chance at a customer.  Finally, I agree most of the boats on my list would be out of his price range, at least new.  I think it is easier to make a decision based on what is a model for a good boat design.
  • SuperMutuSuperMutu Posts: 119 Deckhand
    Thanks for all the feedback.

    To answer the towing question, I will be buying a Tundra(5.7) at the end of the year.
  • pottydocpottydoc Posts: 2,051 Captain
    I want to jump in with another thing that IMO pushed boat prices higher, but I may be completely wrong.    Credit.   I don't think that 40 years ago anyone financed their boats for 15-20 years.  As quality rose, prices rose, and boats became more unaffordable, banks and manufacturers had to figure out how to make them still affordable, hence, crazy long loans.   With 15-20 year loans,  boat builders could make expensive boats and people would still be able to buy them.   
    This ^ And they'll be in about year 15 of their 20 year loan before it's worth what they owe on it. 

  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 2,078 Captain
    pottydoc said:
    First rule, remember that most of the folks putting boats on the do not by list have never been on one of the listed, and get their info from posts on the internet. The same with people bad mouthing a particular brand of outboard. Alll of them break. And absolutely don't listen to,the "4 strokes better than two strokes in every way crowd".  A bay boat sounds like a great first boat for you. There's tons of them out there, with your budget you can easily buy a high mid tier boat a few years old. If you're not in a hurry, a boat show is a great way to,see lots of boats in a short time. You can spend several days at the big ones like Miami and Ft Lauderdale. Walk around on a bunch of them, and start narrowing your list. Figure out what's important to you and your family to have, like forward seating,  a head, large live wells, t top or Bimini, etc. Then start looking for boats that come close to what you want. 

    Insagstor, I once owned a 283 98 Mako. Covered titerally several thousand miles in it, and killed a pile of fish and lobster. Over 40 Bahama trips in it. Repwered it shortly after I bought it from Merc 225 EFI's to F225 Yamaha's. They were pretty much broken for the first 8 months I had it till someone told me what was wrong with them, and then I told Yamaha. Besides the motors, I had exactly ZERO issues with the boat. No wiring problems, no hull problems, no broken hinges or latches, nothing. While they're not the quality of the top their boats you listed, they are not a bad boat. And as far as it goes, the owners of the new Robolos  have pretty much nothing but good things to say about their boats. I have several buddies with high end (think YF and Reg), and both of them have had more stuff break on their boats than my old Mako. And for the OP's 50k budget, he isn't going to find anything on your list. 
    The makos they made in 98 aren’t the same as the ones they make now that bass pro owns the company.  
    You should have been here yesterday

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