Weighting snook flies.

BigVernBigVern Posts: 119 Deckhand
Hi folks, exiled saltwater junkie here again to pick you brains!!

 Thanks for all your help so far.

I am going to tie some weighted snook flies and could use a little advice. Should I tie them extra heavy with dumbbell eyes or lead around the hook shank? I would also like to add a weed guard. Mono or wire and when should I add them? First or last?

Thanks in advance!

Vern

Replies

  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,225 Captain

      I use various diameter lead wire. I don't like the way dumbell eyes mess with a profile. If I add lead, you'll never see it.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 2,831 Captain
    I'm very fond of snook flies with a bit of weight - but you have to be really careful not to overdo it... The first bug shown is my Whitewater Clouser in size 2/0 (Mustad 34007) - it's a staple for working heavy mangrove shorelines and the downed trees that snook like to hang around - note that the eyes aren't lead at all -they're simply largest bead chain (the size you'll find on pull cords for vertical blinds.  Old time hardware stores call this size of bead chain "plumbers chain"....
    This is a "guide's pattern" very simple and quick to tie... the body is just Danville's flat waxed nylon in fl. fire orange (a doubled layer that's also used to secure the eyes (start with hook point down in vise...).  Once I've done the eyes and body on five or ten or fifteen of these each hook gets the barb mashed down and the point triangulated with a 4" mill **** flle...   Now each hook is re-mounted in the vise point up  and I switch to Danville's flat waxed nylon in fl. green... the weedguard is tied in with point facing forward, a sparse amount of white bucktail (twice the hook length is tied into place in front of the eyes, then Pearl Flashabou - 10 to 12 strands with ends staggered, then a similar amount of fl. green of fl. chartreuse bucktail  (the pic shows this one with fl. chartreuse)  is tied in over the flash and white bucktail, the head is built up a bit with thread and whip finished (with that weedguard still sticking straight out... No finish on this bug - simply lightly coat the head with thin super glue (I like Krazy glue...) and allow to dry.  Once dry, bend back the wire weedguard and trim it right where the barb on the hook is... then make a final tiny bend and you're in business... Hope this helps, if I can the next pattern I'll post up this time,  with lead eyes is the Silhouette - one of my signature patterns since the early eighties.... Caught my best big snook on one years ago - weighed around 23lbs on the Boga-grip....
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • BigVernBigVern Posts: 119 Deckhand
    Hi Bob, thanks for the tips. Great looking fly and I think even I might be able to manage that! You would go for wire rather than a mono weed guard. Any reason for that?

     Thanks again and tight lines!

    Vern
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 2,831 Captain
    I've preferred wire for years - it just works better for me - each weedguard is made of #5 stainless trolling wire, coffee colored (I use Malin's)... Each weedguard is pre-made and just another component when I'm tying (since I worked as a commercial tyer for many years speed and efficiency is what you always strive for.... Here's a pic of weedguards ready to use.  I cut them from about 1.25 to 1.5" long - then bend a tiny hairpin bend in one end - that's the end that the thread catches...   The tough part is finishing the pattern  with that piece of wire sticking straight out in front of the hook...
    for size #1 hooks and smaller I go to #4 wire....

    This photo shows weedguards before the final finish coat on the head of each fly - then the guard is bent into position and trimmed.
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • swampsingerswampsinger Montague twp / Lanark cty / Ont. / CanadaPosts: 4 Greenhorn
    I tied some of these up. Going to try them this week.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 2,831 Captain
    Here's another go to bug for me that's weighted - and it may be the best fly I have for working areas with small to medium whitebait present (pilchards, herring, etc...) it's called the Silhouette (and no matter what you've heard... it's been one of my signature patterns since the early eighties).  I tie these up on a 1/0 or 2/0 very strong, sharp hook (Owner Aki mostly these days - in original form it was done up on a Tiemco 800s hook - no longer available).  Every part of this fly is done with wide, webby saddle hackles.... body and tail.

    Although I do it in every color combination you can think of - the plain white with fl. green thread is probably my first choice.  

    Mount up your hook in the vise and tie in ex. small or small lead eyes exactly one lead eye width behind the hook eye (I always paint and bake the eyes as prep work so they're just a simple component when it comes to tying..). Now select six matched wide webby saddles, three on a side and mate them streamer style (curve inward like you'd do for a Deceiver...) and tie them in as a single unit on top of the hook shank, just a slight bit forward of the hook bend.  Now add flash, Flashabou Accent in pearl, (or color of choice) on each side -take six or eight strands of flash as they come from the hank then double them around the barrel of your tying bobbin, staggering the ends about 1/4 to 3/8 inch, then slide the folded flash off the bobbin and onto the thread - then into place... You'll do this on each side of the tail.  Bring the thread back forward to the hook eye and tie in your weedguard forward of the lead eyes, under the hook,  and just leave it sticking straight out before returning the thread to the tail to start the body...  Now, with tail and flash in place take three more of the same saddles, mate them (all curves in the same direction and cut the butt ends with as much of the "fluff" remaining as possible (look at the feather stems and make sure you're not keeping the thick portion that won't wrap around a hook shank...).  Tie in the three as a unit by the butt end (strip off a bit less than 1/8 inch as your tie in point) -then palmer all three forward as a unit ( I use a needle occasionally to free trapped fibers while palmering) going right over the eyes to the hook eye before catching the tips with thread and finishing the tie with a small whip finish... Note: instead of using scissors to trim away the saddle tips after catching them with two or three turns of thread... I simply snap them off sharply with my fingers leaving only the part held by the thread remaining for a very "clean" ending... Once completed touch the very small head with super glue and you're done until it dries - then bend the wire weedguard down into position, trim at the hook barb for length, then a slight bend starting at the hook point and you're done... As aways with weedguards - the toughest part with a wire weedguard is finishing the fly with the wire point sticking out...

    This pattern was always a best seller at any shop I was tying for - and I occasionally filled orders for it to individuals by the 100 per order... That's just one the reasons I was buying feathers by the pound...  For less than five feet of water we fish this with a floating line and simply allow it to sink as much as needed before starting the retrieve... for deeper waters I like to use it with a full intermediate line... For those willing to live chum with a well full of pilchards - this was always my go to bug inshore or way out in bluewater... 
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • BigVernBigVern Posts: 119 Deckhand
    Hi guys. Thanks again for the tips. Those white bugs look great Bob. I am hoping to get to the vice soon, just got to finish some salmon flies for my father first! I will post some pictures of what I can turn out when I can. 

    Huge me thanks again!

    tight lines 

    Vern

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