Fish ID Question

Hi All,

I was hoping to get some expert opinions on these two fish. Caught them on the Suwannee where every fish is very dark to match the leaf-stained water, so it's tough to tell. Even the redbreast sunfish have no red or orange on them - just blackish with a little yellow on the belly.

This first one I think is a warmouth, but I've only caught one before and it didn't look that much like this (but this is a little one, maybe the markings change as they age).



The second one I've never seen before. Looks like a bluegill but I've never seen one with solid tiger stripes like that. I've only seen them with the blotchy bars. I caught about half a dozen other bluegill in the same spot and they were just green-black with no stripes, so this stood out. I was wondering if this could be a hybrid...or have you guys and gals seen this kind of striping on a bluegill before?



Thanks for any insights!

Replies

  • RealSeabeeRealSeabee Posts: 571 Officer
    Looks like Spec and Bluegill to me....I think stripes are just juvenile./ Ok, Warmouth
    When Practice meets opportunity, Set-The-Hook!
  • mplspugmplspug Lake Mary, FloridaPosts: 5,707 Admiral
    Bottom is definitly a Florida strain Bluegill. The top one I believe is a warmouth. It's hard to tell from the picture though, I am just going by the larger than normal mouth for a panfish.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • fishdishfishdish Posts: 1,189 Officer
    Looks like a warmouth to me and other is definitely a bluegill
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,162 Moderator
    fishdish wrote: »
    Looks like a warmouth to me and other is definitely a bluegill

    :Agree Warmouth ..
    "You'll get your weather"
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    Thanks guys! I thought I might have had a new species or two there. I did catch my first spotted sunfish the same day, so at least one new species for me.
  • RealSeabeeRealSeabee Posts: 571 Officer
    The old Stumpknocker...aka best catfish bait known to man
    Sizuper wrote: »
    Thanks guys! I thought I might have had a new species or two there. I did catch my first spotted sunfish the same day, so at least one new species for me.
    When Practice meets opportunity, Set-The-Hook!
  • RealSeabeeRealSeabee Posts: 571 Officer
    When Practice meets opportunity, Set-The-Hook!
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,162 Moderator
    Shellcracker , stumpknocker , redbreast,shellcracker.

    Nice pics.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    Real SeaBee, yours are:
    Redear sunfish, Spotted sunfish, Redbreast sunfish, another Redear sunfish.

    The Redbreast sunfish is a species whose coloration varies widely. The one you have there is bright red belly, no fin coloration.

    Now here are three more examples that look very different:
    *First caught in the black-water Suwannee, no spots, all blackish coloration except a little dull yellow on the belly.
    *Second one caught in a gin-clear creek, the belly is bright yellow-orange, orange spots, with fluorescent orange on the fins.
    *Third one was caught in a river with average water clarity, deep orange-red belly, red spots, dark red fin coloration and distinct aqua face stripes.
    Gill flaps are all very different, too. Cool little fish.
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    Still don't know what this one is...



    When I caught it, I assumed it was a little bluegill, even though it doesn't have bars or stripes, but random spots/blotches (and the spots on the fins, which I've never noticed bluegills have)...but all the other juvenile bluegills I caught from this stream looked like this (like a baby bluegill always looks), so again I am wondering if I don't have some sort of hybrid here, maybe a redear-bluegill cross...
  • RealSeabeeRealSeabee Posts: 571 Officer
    yep for sure....way I had to learn them after my Grandfather taught me everything was a Bluegill redbreast or Brim...Period. I laugh now but that is how it was.
    capt louie wrote: »
    Shellcracker , stumpknocker , redbreast,shellcracker.

    Nice pics.
    When Practice meets opportunity, Set-The-Hook!
  • RealSeabeeRealSeabee Posts: 571 Officer
    the Links are no good for me.

    Sizuper wrote: »
    Still don't know what this one is...



    When I caught it, I assumed it was a little bluegill, even though it doesn't have bars or stripes, but random spots/blotches (and the spots on the fins, which I've never noticed bluegills have)...but all the other juvenile bluegills I caught from this stream looked like this (like a baby bluegill always looks), so again I am wondering if I don't have some sort of hybrid here, maybe a redear-bluegill cross...
    When Practice meets opportunity, Set-The-Hook!
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,113 Officer
    Links don't work for me also.
  • mplspugmplspug Lake Mary, FloridaPosts: 5,707 Admiral
    I live in Seminole county. As a transplant, I am interested in catching a red breast and spotted sunfish just to be able to say I caught one. I have seen red breast in the Wekiva spring/river when canoeing. Generally, are small creeks where I will find red breasts? What is the best technique to catch them?

    Also, is a longear the same as a red breast?

    Captain Todd Approves

  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,162 Moderator
    Creeks and rivers have more redbreasts . They like flowing water. Longears are different than redbreast.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • NSB PhotogNSB Photog Posts: 474 Deckhand
    mplspug wrote: »
    I live in Seminole county. As a transplant, I am interested in catching a red breast and spotted sunfish just to be able to say I caught one. I have seen red breast in the Wekiva spring/river when canoeing. Generally, are small creeks where I will find red breasts? What is the best technique to catch them?

    Also, is a longear the same as a red breast?

    The Wekiva River is loaded with them. Just take an ultralight spinning outfit and a couple of small rooster tails or spinner baits and you will catch plenty.
  • mplspugmplspug Lake Mary, FloridaPosts: 5,707 Admiral
    Cool, thanks! I'm going to have to give it a shot soon.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    mplspug wrote: »
    Also, is a longear the same as a red breast?

    No, different fish. The longear actually has a shorter gill flapnthan the redbreast, usually. But the red belly's flap is thin while the longear's gill flapnis fat. I posted some pics of redbreasts above; here's one of a longear:
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    Crud sorry about the broken links. I'll try to fix them tomorrow when I get to my computer.
  • mplspugmplspug Lake Mary, FloridaPosts: 5,707 Admiral
    Wow, the longears got some great coloration on them. That blue reminds me of pumkinseeds we catch in Minnesota.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    Let's see if this works. Here's the mystery fish...(caught 4 of them)



    And here's what all the bluegills looked like at the same spot in the creek...



    It doesn't have bars or stripes, but random spots/blotches (and the spots on the fins, which I've never noticed bluegills have, and the other bluegills at this spot do not look like this)...so I am wondering if I don't have some sort of hybrid here, maybe a redear-bluegill cross...
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,162 Moderator
    ^ Green sunfish.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    capt louie wrote: »
    ^ Green sunfish.

    Can't be a geeenie because its mouth is tiny. Green sunfish have really big mouths.
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 287 Deckhand
    This has been a fun and informative thread. Thanks to all for joining in. The discussions reinforce a couple things for me, that become more and more clear the more fishing I do and the more fish I catch and see:

    1) The incredible adaptability many fish species have in developing vastly different color patterns depending on their body of water, diet, etc., and

    2) I have no doubt there are many new species of fish swimming right next to our boats or docks or getting caught on our hooks that are genetically unique and yet to be discovered/described by science. With the constantly constricting habitatas, the constantly increasing pollutants and the fast-warming climate, I think we're going to see more species inter-breeding, more genetic splitting and more new species arise in the next few years. Much like we've seen with black Bass. A few years ago there were just 3 - largemouth, smallmouth and Kentucky/Spotted...now there are well over a dozen, upwards of 20 when you count up all the redeye and bartram sub-species.

    Fun for us....but my black bass bucket list is expanding faster than I can fill it!
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,162 Moderator
    Sizuper wrote: »
    Can't be a geeenie because its mouth is tiny. Green sunfish have really big mouths.
    They are different size and different gender it looks like. 10 dorsal spines each.

    Greenie - sticking wid it.
    "You'll get your weather"

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