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View Full Version : pretty clothes, pretty fish, pretty places ...



sunflower
12-12-2011, 06:22 PM
12 December 2011

Caught some fish on the fly a couple of weeks ago ...


Mark

Docked Wages
12-12-2011, 06:28 PM
Great pics, what body of water where you fishing in. Looks like you got into some deeper water fish.

Looks like my Fly bucket list just got a little bit longer!

sunflower
12-12-2011, 06:45 PM
12 December 2011

Dear Docked Wages,

... 7 years in anticipation, 36 airport hours (each way), 6 days in Heaven ... Alphonse Atoll group, Seychelles ...

Mark

Ol'DirtyCaster
12-12-2011, 06:51 PM
Definately a dramatic improvement over your last post. Keep them coming.

deerfly
12-12-2011, 06:58 PM
That's bad a$$ right there, the stuff dreams are made of for sure. Congrat's on making a dream reality.

sunflower
12-12-2011, 07:11 PM
12 December 2011

Dear Deerfly & ODC,

thanks. It was pretty epic. It is a gift to have the chance to do such a thing, it is a great blessing to be smart enough to realize how lucky, and to just enjoy the ever-living-crap out of it...


Mark

jorswors
12-13-2011, 04:34 PM
Wow! How was that milk fish? I've always wanted to catch one. How was the fight?

reeladventures
12-13-2011, 05:32 PM
Nice job! Congrats on getting to go! That looks like it would have been a completely blast!

sunflower
12-13-2011, 07:23 PM
13 December 2011

Dear Jswors,

It was extremely-cool. Basically, the milkfish are like giant mullet, that feed by swimming slowly on the surface with their mouths skimming the top of the water. Conditions are only right to catch them so often. For example, last year in the entire season they only caught 24, but we caught 12 the week I was there, and I got three myself. We came into the lagoon and the channel was glass-smooth, and stacked with a row of giant mantas. The guides knew the bite was on, sice the same conditions favor feeding by both mantas and milkfish.

We stood on coral flats, adjacent to deep channels where the milkfish were trolling forwards and back into the current, interspersed with mantas. You stood still for a few minutes, until you were able to figure out their pattern and drift. My first guide, Wayne, has an almost mystical ability to sense where they would be, what they would do, and when they would bite. We stood and cast small "algea" flies, basically trying to put it into their open mouths. When they hooked up, there was about a 30 second delay before they figured out there was trouble and started to run. We scrambled onto the flats boats for the fight during those moments. The fight was totally-cool. They would run and jump through the channels of the lagoon, a constant rodeo in, around, over, and past coral heads and cropping, each trying to cut the line. The milkfish were strong, and the fight was a lot like a deepwater tarpon fight. They jumped a little less-acrobatically (more like a dolphin, with less head-shaking and tail-walking), and pulled pretty hard. The hook and leader were much lighter, so we didn't pull nearly as hard as on a tarpon. I guess the fight average about 45 minutes.

Here are some fight photos: the fly line going past some mantas (we hooked one!), one guy hooked up, two guys casting for milkfish while I get ready to try to catch the bonefish and snapper tailing on the coral flat, fly in the milkfish's mouth, me on a flat near the surf edge (we were after GT, bonefish, and triggerfish here).

Mark

perseverance32
12-13-2011, 09:44 PM
Wow!! That's awesome. Thanks for sharing.

jorswors
12-13-2011, 10:20 PM
Great report!!! I'm so jealous!

Bill@NSB
12-14-2011, 06:32 AM
Trip of a lifetime for sure. Very nice.

Ish
12-14-2011, 06:47 AM
WOW , that is just an awesome report ... Live it up !

sunflower
12-14-2011, 09:28 AM
14 December 2011

Dear Docked Wages,

I forgot to address your deepwater question. What made the trip super-cool was the variety of fishing we did. I was worried about standing on a flat, and catching bonefish after bonefish for 6 days. We certainly could have done that if we wanted. We caught 5 or 6 in the mornings and at the end of the days as "appetizers," and they were of good size. The fishing varied a lot: bonefishing schools on sand flats, bonefishing singles streaming along edges or islands, going after milkfish from the coral flat "platforms," chasing milkfish in deeper water from boat, ambushing GT along flat edges, casting to sharks and GT's & big barracuda on the flats, hiking for an hour to some "Bagdad wrecks" on the surf edge to target big GT, "dredging" in deepwater with sinking lines for tuna and grouper and wahoo, "species bashing" for everything off coral platforms, casting to GT in channels, walking through the coral flats after single bones & tailing triggerfish, casting straight into the surf for snapper, GT, other trevallies, and just regular bonefishing on flats.

90% done wading.

The swallowtail grouper, other grouper and snapper species, barracuda, and a dogtoth tuna "dredging." It isn't REALLY fly fishing, technically. We dumped 700-grain sinking lines into deepwater edges between the atolls, with big Clousers, and just jigged the fly up until something hit. Something different with every drop: a total hoot.

Mark.

kudzu
12-14-2011, 10:35 AM
Gorgeous trigger!

Shadowcast
12-14-2011, 11:31 PM
Great pics!

FreeFlyFree
12-15-2011, 10:13 AM
Love the color saturation in the pictures!

sunflower
12-15-2011, 12:53 PM
Color saturation!!??
What about the cropping?! ... that's epic!


Mark

Rizangler
12-16-2011, 01:01 AM
Very nice shots

Toddlle
12-16-2011, 01:13 AM
Way to grab life by the balls, nice work. I , too, have been on a few of those "just once in a lifetime" trips, you just added to mine.

sunflower
12-16-2011, 11:13 AM
16 DEcember 2011

Dear Toddle,

Thanks! That's cool.
It's fun to post the pictures and describe it not just for the bragging (which I have to admit exists), but to say to and show others: "Look how cool this was! You should try it if you ever could." I saw Larry Dhalberg and Jose Wejebe and the Wildfly group in the Seychelles on TV over the years .... and said "I'm sure going to try that some day."

and I was blessed that someday got here ...

Mark

KyleStyle
12-16-2011, 05:17 PM
Thanks for sharing! Those are awesome pictures.

Elk Chaser
12-17-2011, 09:40 AM
Beautiful spot. In the South?

Spineyman
12-17-2011, 10:04 AM
Wow, just incredible back drop and gorgeous water and surroundings.

Zhunter
03-11-2013, 03:57 PM
To revive and old thread, that looks amazing :)

I might have to go ;)

shouldabeenworkin
03-11-2013, 10:06 PM
absoulutely unbelievable, great job, great pics, hope to do something like that some day before I'm too old to pull it off.

FreeFlyFree
03-14-2013, 06:28 PM
Definitely worth reviving, gotta make it over there!!!!!!!!

tj5485
03-20-2013, 02:15 AM
Looked great. I love reading reports like this. I too will make it to they seychelles area soon. I'm possibly planning a trip for the end of 2014. Thinking of Farquhar for GTs. Does the outfitter give you patterns to tie in preparation for the trip? Very jealous. Looked like heaven.

sunflower
03-21-2013, 01:55 PM
Dear tj5485,

I wish you well. From what I understand, Farquar is maybe even cooler than Alphonse Atoll. Even further off the grid. I think it has more GT, no milkfish, but bumphead parrotfish. The lodge is a lot more primitive, and it is more expensive.

I'm sure they will send you patterns if you ask. Outfitters like Yellowdog or Aardvarck-McCloud will also sell you fly packs. I would definitely use an outfitter .... it won't add to the expense. The guides on Alphonse had an excellent selection you could buy from them. In fact, Alphonse actually had a decent selection of emergency fly equipment you could buy. I lost my super-heavy "dredging" line on the first drift, but bought another.